slip

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slip

(slip)
1. To move out of a customary place; to dislocate (e.g., an intervertebral disk).
2. To slide into or on top of.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, the effects of characteristics of centerline curvature and area ratio on the inlet performance at 0 and 5 degrees of angle of attack and sideslip angles are computationally investigated.
Supposing the vehicle forward speed is a constant, it is apparent from the figures that the sideslip angle gain arose with the increasing of wheels steering scale factor.
where [phi], [??], and [psi] are the aircraft roll, pitch, and yaw angles, respectively; [alpha] and [beta] are the angles of attack and sideslip, respectively; P, Q, and R are the aircraft angular rates; Nx, Ny, and Nz are the axial load factors; [[delta].sub.E], [[delta].sub.A], and [[delta].sub.R] are the elevator, aileron and rudder deflections, respectively; [T.sub.TH] is the throttle; h is the altitude; [T.sub.AIR] is the air temperature; T AS is the true aircraft airspeed; CR is the aircraft climbing rate; Tr is the track angle; and W is the wind direction.
Pete could have defused Sebastian's frustration further by asking him to assist in demonstrating how one sideslips while belayed by a rope.
However, from the perspective of improving vehicle's attitude of plane motion, with the assistance of the FO-PID controller, the maximum sideslip angle is smaller and the yaw rate is less fluctuated, showing that the vehicle can achieve a smoother lane change.
Figures 7 and 8 depict attitude (angle of pitch and yaw) and hydrodynamic (angle of attack and sideslip) angles during the sailing, respectively.
If a wings-level aircraft is disturbed--whether by turbulence or aileron input--it rolls and will begin moving sideways toward the lowered wing, a sideslip. When that happens, the lowered wing, which is moving forward more quickly than the other wing, experiences a greater angle of attack.
In 2005, Fischer concluded that striations are cause by, "collapsed sidewalls of tires that lose lateral traction and begin to sideslip through a turn." [26] Fischer goes on to state that, "It is the sidewall contacting the pavement, not the tire tread, that causes the unique striations in the yaw marks." Fischer includes Figure A9 (Exhibit 15 in his paper, originally a figure found within the Traffic Crash Investigation manual published by Northwestern University) to communicate his sidewall collapse theory.
The measured parameters are GPS positions, velocities, accelerations, pitch, roll, yaw, heading, angle of attack, angle of sideslip, dynamic total pressure, and total temperature.
Calibrated airspeed corrects for varying AoA or sideslip. True airspeed corrects for temperature and pressure variations.
It covers longitudinal, vertical, and lateral dynamics, including the wheel, driving resistances and power requirement, converters, driving performance diagrams and fuel consumption, driving limits, ride dynamics, vehicle substitute models, the single track model, the tire sideslip angle, steering, circular driving at a constant speed, dynamic behavior, the influence of wheel load transfer, and toe-in/toe-out, camber, and self-steering coefficient.