handedness

(redirected from sidedness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

handedness

 [hand´ed-nes]
the preferential use of the hand of one side in all voluntary motor acts; see also dextrality and sinistrality.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nes), [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.
Chemistry The left- or right-sidedness, or asymmetry of virtually everything in the universe from the ‘lowly’ molecule to highly complex organisms
Neurology A state of dominance of use of a preferred side, as in left-handed or right-handed

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs)
Preference for the use of one hand, most commonly the right, associated with dominance of the opposite cerebral hemisphere; may also be the result of training or habit.

handedness

The natural tendency to use one hand rather than the other for skilled manual tasks such as writing. Ambidexterity-the indifferent use of either hand-is rare. About 10% of people are left-handed.

hand·ed·ness

(hand'ĕd-nĕs) [MIM*139900]
Preference for the use of one hand, more commonly the right.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the possible interaction effects of message sidedness with bases of self-esteem on attitudes are examined, it can be seen that there is a significant interaction between personal self-esteem and message sidedness ([F.sub.3,195] = 4.27, p = .04), such that individuals with low personal self-esteem formed more positive attitudes when exposed to the one-sided message ([M.sub.low pc & 1-sided] = 3.67) than when exposed to the two-sided message ([M.sub.low pc & 2-sided] = 3.40).
However, there was a significant interaction between gender and message sidedness in their effect on attitudes.
When three-way interactions are examined, it can be seen that there is a near significant trend for relational bases of self-esteem, message sidedness, and gender to interact [[F.sub.7,191] = 3.65, p = .058].
Message sidedness was shown to be one of the message variables that clarify this complex relationship.
Message sidedness was also found to interact with the bases of self-esteem, such that low personal self-esteem individuals were more prone to persuasion when exposed to a one-sided message.
Results showed that message sidedness interacted with gender, with males displaying more favorable attitudes when exposed to a one-sided message.
A further study using a different persuasive message, conducted with a more heterogeneous sample consisting of respondents coming from a broader range of age groups and social backgrounds would further clarify the relationships among self-esteem, message sidedness, and persuasibility.
Beyond the aforementioned limitations, in the present study light was shed on the existence of complexity in the way that, as important audience variables, self-esteem and bases of self-esteem interact with the message variable of message sidedness in producing change in attitudes.
(10.) The Adnyamathanha case provides an interesting historical example of how moiety membership and sidedness, once closely congruent, can become disconnected.
The sidedness rates provided above for various populations represent `best fit' bipartitions for the networks concerned, but by no means the only ones.
-- (in press) Network Mediation of Exchange Structures: Ambilateral Sidedness; and Property Flows in Pul Eliya (Sri Lanka).