sickly

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Related to sickliness: silliness

sickly

(sĭk′lē)
adj. sick·lier, sick·liest
1. Prone to sickness.
2. Of, caused by, or associated with sickness: a sickly pallor.
3. Conducive to sickness: a sickly climate.
4. Causing nausea; nauseating.

sick′li·ness n.
sick′ly, sick′li·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
She reveals a generally essentialist set of opinions on women's health, with sickliness viewed as a desirably feminine attribute and, conversely, as retribution for unfeminine behaviour.
The powers of Hyde seemed to have grown with the sickliness of Jekyll" In other words, if you practice evil, you become evil.
Drunk neat or with ice, it is a light and refreshing spirit which lacks the sickliness of other orange liqueurs.
A sliced loaf in waxed paper would disappear in the blink of an eye as from these meagre ingredients sandwiches were made -sugar pieces, they called them and when I was given one I was almost sick with the crunchy sickliness of it.
and then, after this elaborate Georgian sickliness, spare free verse thin and clipped on the page, in imitation of E.
In the forty-five years since Trilling published his essay, critics have steadily reinforced the notion that Fanny's debility is a disturbing force--not by their focus on her sickliness, but through their neglect of it.
A tendency toward sickliness and an insatiable interest in science fiction coalesce in this depiction of the feverish nightmares that come to the bedridden boy.
Europe becomes a symbol of motherhood and immortality: "Her stones, chiseled by the hands of past generations, the swarm of her faces emerging from carved wood, from paintings, from the gilt of embroidered fabrics, soothed one, and my voice was added to her old challenges and oaths in spite of my refusal to accept her split and her sickliness.
AS the scrawny, size-eight figure took centre-stage in a rosebud pink, insipid bridesmaid-style frock I knew we were in for a performance of sickliness unparalleled in Oscar history.
They move from sickliness to health as they spend more and more time out of doors.
Dorn's poem, much less confident than Antin's talk about the irrelevance of British culture in the United States or the sickliness of its influence there, at first seems rooted in the longstanding American desire to assert national identity against all that which might be thought to cover it over.