sibship

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sibship

 [sib´ship]
a group of individuals born of the same parents.

sib·ship

(sib'ship),
1. The reciprocal state between individuals who have the same pair of parents.
2. All progeny of one pair of parents.
[A.S. sib, relationship]

sibship

/sib·ship/ (-ship)
1. relationship by blood.
2. a group of persons all descended from a common ancestor.
3. a group of siblings.

sibship

[sib′ship]
Etymology: AS sibb, kin, scieppan, to shape
1 the state of being related by blood.
2 a group of people descended from a common ancestor who are used as a basis for genetic studies.
3 brothers and sisters considered as a group.

sibship

a group of animals born of the same parents.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, trends in the current study for both sibships and spatial autocorrelation are toward older adults of each sex having undergone more complete dispersion to greater distances than younger adults.
Sibship Patterns--In the current study, the remarkably high mean separation of full sib pairs (7.
Sibship reconstruction from genetic data with typing errors.
In our previous three papers, the data on gender distributions in sibships of two children came from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) for years 19871993 and 1998-2002.
Human sex ratios and sex distribution in sibships of size 2.
Birth Order and Education Attainments in Full Sibships.
5) Austen's experience of interlocking sibships, enormous by any measure, provided her with extensive data about how they work, so that her novels can depict sibling dynamics with complexity and sophistication.
As a novelist, however, Austen was concerned with less successful sibships, where the comfortable, taken-for-granted outcome of birth order has been disrupted by accidents of life or the influence of social and economic structures.
The results thus appear to support the first hypothesis for sibships consisting of two children, but not for sibships of three or more.
For two-child sibships, the implication is that the older child receives more process and more outcome feedback from parents than does the younger child.
Mean sibship size is naturally quite large, since the sample consists of individuals from families with at least two siblings in the NLSY, and the average sibship is approximately half female.
Likewise, it is possible that the sex of the sibling closest in age directly influences a child's own achievement, even after controlling for the sex composition of the full sibship.