sibilant

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sibilant

 [sib´ĭ-lant]
shrill, whistling, or hissing.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt),
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

/sib·i·lant/ (sib´ĭ-lant) whistling or hissing.

sibilant

[sib′ilənt]
Etymology: L, sibilare, to hiss
a hissing sound or one in which the predominant sound is /s/.

sibilant

adjective Whistling, hissing.

sibilant

Physical exam adjective Whistling, hissing

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant

1. Hissing.
2. A speech sound, such as ‘s’, ‘sh’ or ‘z’.
3. A sibilant consonant.

sib·i·lant

(sib'i-lănt)
Hissing or whistling in character; denoting a form of rhonchus.
[L. sibilans (-ant-), pres. p. of sibilo, to hiss]

sibilant (sib´ilənt),

adj accompanied by a hissing sound; especially a type of fricative speech sound. The phonemes /s/ and /z/ are sibilants.

sibilant

shrill, whistling or hissing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of a different lyric effect is the language describing the baby elephant with "tusks/hacksawed off": a phonetic arrangement involving sibilance (s's) and the unvoiced glottal k's, which simulate a kind of saw-like rasp in themselves before resolving into the word "cash," which resounds like a despicable whisper (shh).
52 [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (which, notwithstanding the sibilance, does not mean `serpents'
10 Instead, these poems unfold on the windswept cliffs of Cornwall so that, composed as they are of sibilance, transparent color scheme, and ebbing rhythms, they are permeated with a windswept quality, one that does not (as do Richards' "house poems") hold disparate tenses together in an enclosed space.
But in comparison, Creative's EP630 are even more rolled off, with a sporadic dose of sibilance.
That wordplay from "Ambassador kissed" to "satin mask" is glaringly not serendipitous, is it, but just a stunt in sibilance, altogether foreseen by the poet and opted for, calculated, even, to sound like what poetry does with phonetic resemblances but not actually to be it.
The phrase,"it shone like a star"is an example of what: sibilance, simile or synecdoche?
One can hear enhanced detail of the voice but sibilance is in no way exacerbated.
1) To do this, he uses certain techniques such as repetition, alliteration, emphasis on sibilance and/or sound fricatives, and creating sentences with multiple subordinate clauses that have a hypnopaediac or lulling effect on the listeners:
38-40)--to portray poetry as something to be perceived both visually and orally, and the sibilance of the muted consonants and vowel sounds gratify the sense of hearing.
All three names have an element of sibilance, and conventional French endings indicating femininity.
To that discreet sibilance I sit down at the empire desk, red lacquer and gold scrolls.
The closure of the dialogue is based on poetic, nondiscursive, nonreferential qualities (the flow of sibilance and half rhymes and internal rhymes, the use of silence, the halting and merging of unfinished sentences), on the sensuous and suggestive qualities of the discourse (the mention of food and eating, intimations of hot and cold, references to the flow of water, juxtaposing of water and burning), and on the ritualistic, chantlike features of interspersed polyphonic voices.