sialolithiasis


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sialolithiasis

 [si″ah-lo-lĭ-thi´ah-sis]
a condition characterized by the presence of sialoliths.

si·a·lo·li·thi·a·sis

(sī'ă-lō-li-thī'ă-sis),
The formation or presence of a salivary calculus.
[sialolith + G. -iasis, condition]

si·a·lo·li·thi·a·sis

(sī'ă-lō-li-thī'ă-sis)
The formation or presence of a salivary calculus.
[sialolith + G. -iasis, condition]

sialolithiasis

Stones (calculi) in the salivary glands or ducts. This affects the submandibular gland in 80 percent of cases and the parotid gland in 20 percent of cases. The sublingual gland is rarely affected. The condition is the most frequent cause of inflammatory disorders of the salivary glands. It may be treated by sialogogues and gland massage, shock wave lithotripsy or sialoendoscopy.

si·a·lo·li·thi·a·sis

(sī'ă-lō-li-thī'ă-sis)
The formation or presence of a salivary calculus.
[sialolith + G. -iasis, condition]
References in periodicals archive ?
The exact disappearance or reduction rate of complaints after sialendoscopy applications ranges from 80 to 90%, and the success rates of sialolithiasis are higher than those of non-stone disorders (5-7, 10, 11).
Several techniques are used for diagnosis of sialolithiasis, ranging from simple techniques such as palpation and inspection [2], including analysis of secreted saliva [2, 7], to complementary examinations such as radiography, sialography, computed tomography, and ultrasonography [1-7].
Sialolithiasis in the submandibular gland tends to develop in the duct whereas, in the parotid gland, calculi are commonly found at the hilum or parenchyma.
A proforma was filled after diagnosis of sialolithiasis by a detailed history, clinical examination and necessary radiographic investigation.
Obstruction by salivary duct stones is known as sialolithiasis and affects men (generally, middle-aged males) twice as often as women.
Sialolithiasis is the most common disease affecting adult salivary glands, accounting for more than 50% of all salivary gland conditions.
(5) Differential diagnosis for unilateral lesions containing cysts includes sialolithiasis, first branchial cleft cyst, HIV-associated BLEL, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and benign mixed tumor.
Bilateral or multiple-gland sialolithiasis is occurring in fewer than 3% of cases.2 In patients with multiple stones, calculi may be located in differ- ent positions along the salivary duct and gland.
However, the procedure can lead to side effects such as the formation of calcium granules retained in the tarsal plate, in addition to mucocele and sialolithiasis, which may obstruct the transplanted duct (TERMOTE, 2003).
In one series of salivary gland aspirates, more than 50% of the patients referred for FNAB had a nonneoplastic process, including sialadenosis, sialadenitis, sialolithiasis, and retention cyst.
Initiation and progression of salivary gland infections depends on the decrease in host resistance to infection and may be encountered secondary to a variety of predisposing conditions including trauma, immunosuppression, debilitation and local conditions such as duct obstruction by sialolithiasis, stricture or other pathology.
The most common salivary gland disorders were acute sialoadenitis and sialolithiasis seen with equal frequency.