shunting


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shunting

The bypassing of alveoli by blood circulating through the lungs.
 
Aetiology
Atelectasis, portal hypertension, small airway obstruction, smoke inhalation injury.
 
Diagnosis
Hypoxaemia that only partially improves with high inspired O2 concentrations (e.g., arterial O2 tension/PaO2 < 200 mm Hg for inspired O2 concentration FIO2 = 100%).

shunting

Lung physiology The bypassing of alveoli by blood circulating through the lungs Etiology Atelectasis, portal hypertension, small airway obstruction, smoke inhalation injury Diagnosis Hypoxemia that only partially improves with high inspired O2 concentrations–eg, arterial O2 tension/PaO2 < 200 mm Hg for inspired O2 concentration FIO2 = 100%

shunting

A condition in which blood, by going through an abnormal pathway or bypass, does not travel its normal route. It may occur when an arteriovenous fistula forms or in congenital anomalies of the heart in which the blood passes from the right atrium or ventricle directly to the left atrium or ventricle respectively, through a defect in the wall (septum) that normally separates the atria and ventricles.
Synonym: blood shunting
References in periodicals archive ?
Akdemir, "An unusual mechanism of delayed intracerebral hemorrhage after ventriculoperitoneal shunting: case report," Journal of Neurological Sciences, vol.
However, surgical shunting that mostly refers to distal splenorenal shunts (DSRSs), portacaval shunts (PCSs) or H-graft PCSs (HGPCSs) has generally disappeared for the widespread application of TIPS.
Temporary femoral artery bifurcation shunting following penetrating trauma.
VICTORIAN ELEGANCE The former shunting shed has been sympathetically converted to a charming family home.
Major Finding: Patients who have migraine with aura and a heart with a large right-to-left shunt showed significant deficits in verbal learning and memory, compared with patients with no right-to-left shunting.
When more precise evaluation of shunting is indicated, these more accurate indices should be employed.
The use of the peritoneal cavity for CSF absorption in ventriculoperitoneal shunting is standard care in the management of hydrocephalus.
Inspired by Taussig's suggestion, Blalock produced pulmonary hypertension in dogs and showed that the resulting cyanosis could be relieved by shunting the subclavian artery into the pulmonary artery.
At that time, shunting already was being used successfully to treat children with hydrocephalus.