seat

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seat

(sēt),
A surface against which an object may rest to gain support.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

seat

(set)
A structure on which another structure rests or is supported.

basal seat

Tissues in the mouth that support a denture.

bathtub seat

1. An assistive technology device that helps people with functional limitations to bathe. Some seats have modified features to help people transfer in and out of tubs, pools, or showers. Synonym: bath bench; shower seat
2. A device for bathing infants.

CAUTION!

Infant drownings have occurred during bathtub seat use.

elevated toilet seat

Raised toilet seat.

raised toilet seat

A device for raising the height of a toilet to facilitate use by persons with limited strength or movement. Synonym: elevated toilet seat

rest seat

An area on which a denture or restoration rests.

shower seat

Bathtub seat (1).
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

seat

(sēt)
A surface against which an object may rest to gain support.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The suggested retail price for the Bath Safe Corner Shower Seat is $110.
Inside the shower area, when the child can transfer, various shower seats are available (also called shower benches) which are similar to bath seats.
All the accessible state-rooms have roll-in showers, distress alarms, grab bars, shower seat, and handheld showerheads.
With advance notice, a shower seat can be available.
The bathroom has a roll-in shower, adjustable shower seat, grab bars, and hand-held showerhead.
If a wheelchair user can transfer, the easiest solution is often a shower seat attached to the shower wall.
You can use a shower seat once you are in the stall, so you need not stand while showering.
Washroom areas have been modified for accessibility, and wheelchair users can transfer from their chairs to the toilet and/or shower seat.
Most homeowners who are making this change from tub to shower because of accessibility concerns are further enhancing their new shower with grab bars, built-in shower seats, handheld shower accessories and shower curtains that make access easier than a door, Northrop said.
Al-Jledan pointed out that the Department of Home Health Care provided patients with many health services and a total of 232 medical devices, including 53 beds, 55 air mattresses, 40 wheelchairs, six shower seats, 16 electronic devices for measuring blood pressure, seven oxygen concentrators, 14 devices for monitoring blood glucose levels, 10 devices to drain accumulated fluid in respiratory and quadriplegia patients, and four walking aid devices.