shoulder instability

shoulder instability

A shoulder weakened by subluxation or dislocation.
 
Shoulder instability can be classified by:
• Direction: anterior (98% of cases), posterior or inferior;
• Aetiology—traumatic or nontraumatic; and
• Volition­—voluntary or involuntary.

shoulder instability

Orthopedics The weakening of the glenohumeral joint by subluxation or dislocation. See Multidirectional shoulder instability.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shoulder instability disorders tend to affect younger people.
Surgery is seldom required unless there is a history of chronic shoulder instability and repeated dislocations.
Then there are the more purely athletic injuries, such as ACL and meniscus tears and shoulder instability.
He specializes in performing shoulder and elbow replacement surgery, shoulder instability repair, rotator cuff repair procedures and fracture care.
As the anterosuperior labral variations have not been associated with shoulder instability, it was suggested that they may not always have to be repaired (Rao et al 2003).
32) In the study by Cooper and Brems, (33) they diagnosed GJH in 29 of the 38 cases with multi-directional shoulder instability.
Quantifying glenoid bone loss arthroscopically in shoulder instability.
Exclusion criteria included acute shoulder pain (less than three months), the presence of frozen shoulder, disorders of the acromioclavicular joint, degenerative arthritis of the glenohumeral joint, calcific tendinopathy, shoulder instability, posttraumatic disorders, or shoulder surgery and/or elbow, hand, wrist and cervical spine disorders.
Some of the common pathologies of shoulder include rotator cuff tear, impingement syndrome, shoulder instability and frozen shoulder.
Defining a pitfall as a situation in the pathway of care that can compromise or complicate the course of treatment and the outcome, orthopaedic surgeons warn colleagues what to watch out for in the diagnosis of shoulder conditions, treating shoulder impingement, treating anterior shoulder instability, the diagnosis and management of posterior and multidirectional instability, treating shoulder pain in throwing athletes, rotator cuff surgery, managing proximal humerus fractures, acromioclavicular joint injuries, treating clavicle fractures, and shoulder arthroplasty.
This article addresses the more recent concepts that influence management decisions in the treatment of shoulder instability.
One hundred and thirty-five patients with clinical symptoms of shoulder instability presented for MRI arthrography of the shoulder, of whom 118 were injected using the anterior ultrasound-guided approach, and 17 were injected using the established posterior ultrasound-guided approach for pre-MRI contrast injection.