shortening

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shortening

1. Loss of bone length after a fracture, as a result of malunion or pronounced bony angulation.
2. A decrease in the length of a contracting muscle fiber.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of shortening, no water phase is required, so it is typically just the oil/emulsifier blend that is pumped into the heat exchanger for rapid chilling.
This section shall take effect on July 1, 2007 with respect to oils, shortenings and margarines containing artificial trans fat that are used for frying or in spreads; except that the effective date of this section with regard to oils or shortenings used for deep frying of yeast dough or cake batter, and all other food containing artificial trans fat, shall be July 1, 2008.
This category includes products such as cakes and cookies, which tend to use solid shortenings to deliver on flavor and functionality.
Read the label on many varieties of bread, especially in the United States, and you'll likely find vegetable shortening and other additives among the ingredients that increase loaf size and lengthen the product's shelf life.
The switch was not to pure vegetable oil, but to partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening.
Partially hydrogenated margarines and shortenings may contain up to 40 percent of their fats in this modified -- or transform.
Lower cost compared to other reduced saturate shortenings
AAK Bakery Services' Operations Director Gary Atkinson said: "Akofluid Pumpable Shortenings bring a number of benefits, such as reducing waste and the use of mechanised handling with its associated environmental impacts, and helping manufacturers meet the FSA's guidelines on saturated fat and calorie reduction.
Recipes use Crisco oils or shortenings - which is OK in most cases - but a chocolate tart filling with butter-flavor shortening is a turn-off - and goes a little too far.
Butter and anhydrous milkfat have been replaced by vegetable shortenings for many applications in the baking industry.
Remember those nasty trans fats that help make margarine and shortenings more solid than oils?
When formulating a healthier shortening for use in baking applications, a HOLL canola/fully saturated cottonseed blend performed better than conventional commercial shortenings in a series of trials by providing uniform grain, soft crumb, and good volume," said Frank Orthoefer of FTO Food Technology LLC, referring to conclusions in his baking study.