shortening

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shortening

1. Loss of bone length after a fracture, as a result of malunion or pronounced bony angulation.
2. A decrease in the length of a contracting muscle fiber.
References in periodicals archive ?
Commenting on Olera GOLD, Haresh Bhatt, CEO of Natu'oil Services said, "The US and Canadian companies that have made a superior commitment to sustainability will be encouraged to see that 100% certified sustainable palm shortenings will now be available nationwide.
AAK customers can reduce overall fat content by up to 25% when compared when a traditional boxed shortening.
It's also in ingredients such as margarine and shortening that are used in many baked goods, store-bought crackers and snack foods.
Ingredients included: vegetable shortening, sugar, enriched bleached flour, water, dextrose, soy flour, cornstarch, mono- and diglycerides, sodium stearoyl lactylate, soy lecithin, salt, natural and artificial flavors, modified wheat starch, baking soda, sodium acid pyrophospate, monocalcium phosphate, sodium propionate, potassium sorbate, beta-carotene, fumaric acid, and agar.
Read the label on many varieties of bread, especially in the United States, and you'll likely find vegetable shortening and other additives among the ingredients that increase loaf size and lengthen the product's shelf life.
The switch was not to pure vegetable oil, but to partially hydrogenated vegetable shortening.
Partially hydrogenated margarines and shortenings may contain up to 40 percent of their fats in this modified -- or transform.
Lower cost compared to other reduced saturate shortenings
June 13, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Global Agri-trade Corporation (GATC), a premier supplier of certified sustainable palm products, announced today the introduction of Olera GOLD Low Color Palm Shortening, a 100% Certified Sustainable multi-purpose palm shortening.
Therefore it does not require the heated storage to maintain fluidity as is needed for pumpable shortenings.
Butter and anhydrous milkfat have been replaced by vegetable shortenings for many applications in the baking industry.
Remember those nasty trans fats that help make margarine and shortenings more solid than oils?