short-winded


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short-winded

(shôrt′wĭn′dĭd)
adj.
1. Breathing with quick labored breaths.
2. Likely to have difficulty in breathing, especially from exertion.
3. Brief and succinct.
4. Choppy; disconnected.
References in periodicals archive ?
A noted early 20th century state judicial reformer, New Jersey Chief Justice Arthur Vanderbilt, pointed out that judicial reform is not a sport for the short-winded.
Slighted by many experts as too ill-bred, too short-winded or just plain too slow to win the Kentucky Derby, Harlan's Holiday and Came Home can change a lot of minds by coming through today at Churchill Downs in the 128th running of the race by which history judges young racehorses.
While the paper's initial announcement declared a five-year commitment, further involvement has proven once again that school reform is not a sport for the short-winded.
The opening of Presque transi, a piece in which the pauses between phrases carry so much of the expressive weight, comes over sounding a bit short-winded, though the contrapuntal delicacy of the work's second section is beautifully realized.
I recognize that pursuing professionalism is no sport for the short-winded.
So it was that, at age 60, King Shabaka, short-winded and feeling cheated, lived alongside but not exactly with his Queen, who - if the truth be told - often asked Allah to sneeze her into the afterworld where her faith and loving kindness would be better appreciated.
The overall impression that is left with the reader after having read the contents of this piece, and the other contributions to this edited volume, is that the task of developing better human rights data, as Shestack once said of the quest for human rights in general, "|is not a sport for the short-winded.
In fact plenty, if not most, of the art works produced here in Cairo fall short of their potential due to the short-winded, or perhaps short-sighted, execution by their creators.
Glass's opera is short, and, given its epic subject, short-winded.
It is not surprising if trainers with large strings, owners with business interests, and jockeys with busy schedules can be difficult to contact and short-winded in reply, but that is not the major determining factor.
The same question is valid whether running black bear in the western states where it is still allowed or, in rarer instances, the odd behemoth mountain lion (typically a short-winded beast) pursued across rugged terrain or deep snow.
The best chapter, apart from the one on New York intellectuals, is on the traumatized experiences of Primo Levi and Jean Amery, but even this seems inconclusive and short-winded, a point I would make about many chapters, especially the one that tries to dispose of Richard Rorty's relativism.