short-acting insulin


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short-acting insulin

a clear preparation of regular (crystalline zinc) insulin with an immediate (15 to 30 minutes) onset of action that reaches a peak of action in 2 to 4 hours. The duration of action is 6 to 8 hours. There is considerable variation in individual patients and with different doses in the same patient. Therefore these data should be considered only as rough guidelines. Also called rapid-acting insulin. Compare intermediate-acting insulin, long-acting insulin. See also insulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
As people with type 1 diabetes mellitus often suffer from weight gain (11), short-acting insulin reduction strategies arise as beneficial for weight management (12).
Vomiting and associated loss of ingested carbohydrate or nausea and decreased intake of carbohydrate require caution when administering prandial and corrective doses of short-acting insulin (24).
In patients with good metabolic control after discontinuation of oral agents, blood glucose could be controlled with small subcutaneous doses (4-10 U) of short-acting insulin (Table 2).
Gary, who developed Type 1 diabetes when he was 12, controls his condition with a combination of a long-acting basal insulin analogue to control his background insulin levels and a short-acting insulin that he takes at mealtimes.
The results of a number of ongoing trials into the safety and effectiveness of inhaled short-acting insulin were presented at the conference.
Insulin pumps are small machines (about the size of a cell phone or beeper) with tiny computers that deliver continuous short-acting insulin through a thin plastic tube inserted just under the skin.
Normally, intermediate-acting insulin is given in the morning and at night, along with a short-acting insulin before each meal.
A combination of short-acting insulin at meal-times with Lantus administered once daily at bedtime can achieve excellent glucose control.
Semilente: A special type of short-acting insulin that takes 1-2 hours for onset, peaks 3 to 8 hours after injection, and lasts 10-16 hours.
In the sliding-scale regimen, short-acting insulin is given three to four times a day according to an algorithm that factors in blood sugar levels, planned activities and sugar consumption.
Finally, a supplemental (correction) scale is calculated, which estimates the fall in blood glucose per unit of rapid- or short-acting insulin.
Not only does it work as well as established short-acting insulin, but it has one huge advantage--it will free diabetes patients from injections forever