shop floor


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shop floor

A term loosely equivalent to bedside or ward.
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Manufacturers might also believe that the more complex a solution, the better it will be in solving shop floor integration issues.
On the rough shop floor, women too displayed their defensive "womanly" bearing against such masculine aggression.
To make this possible, two key changes were made to the shop floor.
But if they are genuinely interested in forms of flexibility that do not amount simply to abandonment of legitimate worker and community concerns, they will join labor and progressive groups in support of a more independent voice for their workers on the shop floor.
What these tensions translate into is a form of low-intensity conflict on the shop floor, with workers filing grievances, supervisors taking disciplinary action, and the two tearing at each others' throats in ways more than metaphorical.
Project manufacturers will remove a significant amount of paperwork and inefficiency from the shop floor through online instructions and activity tracking, thereby improving the quality of the products, audit trails, and information produced, and meeting LEAN and paperless manufacturing objectives.
Also presenting new Priamus Shop Floor Control, a central plant process-information system based on cavity-pressure and temperature signals.
Tesco project manager Simon Hick said that giving managers the use of email alone on the shop floor would free up seven to eight hours a week.
As for the second point, the improvement, Imazu said that they practice Genba kanri, shop-floor management, which essentially means that problems are solved and improvements are made at the actual place where they arise: on the shop floor.
The foundry needed a system that could avoid erroneous or old data and eliminate the "paperwork nightmare," while simplifying shop floor workers' processing responsibilities.
Manufacturing execution systems (MES) rely on real-time shop floor data from bar codes and related technologies to manage production resources and meet schedules.
In this she focuses on the application of Taylorism and scientific management to the office setting, suggesting that the drive for efficiency, control, and productivity characterizing the shop floor shaped the front office as well.