shop


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shop

noun A place where a thing is produced and/or displayed and sold.

verb To peruse or purchase wares from an emporium or enterprise.

shop

See Sweatshop, Workshop.
References in classic literature ?
They ate them by candle-light after the shop was closed.
This business of setting up a petty shop is almost the only resource of women, in circumstances at all similar to those of our unfortunate recluse.
The officer pounced on the soldiers who were in the shops, but at that moment fearful screams reached them from the huge crowd on the Moskva bridge and the officer ran out into the square.
In the scattered situations where shops appear, those shops are not besieged by the crowds of more populous thoroughfares.
First, however, to find out their abode, which was probably within easy distance of the shop.
Jacob was eating his pie by large mouthfuls, and looking round at the other good things in the shop, while he embraced his pitchfork with his left arm, and laid his left hand on some Bath buns.
Anthony, as he called them, and a great rabble with them, bringing along with them the true widow that I was pretended to be; and they came sweating and blowing into the shop, and with a great deal of triumph, dragging the poor creature in the most butcherly manner up towards their master, who was in the back shop, and cried out aloud, 'Here's the widow, sir; we have catcher her at last.'
She then began to look about her for a shop in which she might dispose of something for the moment.
Bumble entered the shop; and supporting his cane against the counter, drew forth his large leathern pocket-book: from which he selected a small scrap of paper, which he handed over to Sowerberry.
"Bon jour, Planchet," replied D'Artagnan, stooping to enter the shop.
Then the customer of comparatively tender years would get suddenly disconcerted at having to deal with a woman, and with rage in his heart would proffer a request for a bottle of marking ink, retail value sixpence (price in Verloc's shop one-and-sixpence), which, once outside, he would drop stealthily into the gutter.
But, the little shop is so excessively dark, is stuck so full of black shelves and brackets and nooks and corners, that he sees Mr Venus's cup and saucer only because it is close under the candle, and does not see from what mysterious recess Mr Venus produces another for himself until it is under his nose.