chute

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chute

1. a device used to restrain large animals especially cattle and horses. It is a small stall into which the animal is encouraged to walk. The head is fixed, in cattle by a head bail, the back is closed and the animal can then be examined or treated. The quality of the chute depends on its freedom from injury to the animal and the operator and the accessibility of the animal for the procedures to be conducted. Speed of throughput is also an important consideration when large numbers are to be handled in repetitive treatments and quick-release gates are an essential part of the unit. Called also stocks, crush.
2. a similar crate or stall at a rodeo in which a wild animal can be saddled and mounted before being released to buck with the rider.

hydraulic chute
one where the functions of closing the head catch, closing the tail gait and applying the side-squeeze are done hydraulically using separate controls for each function. Installed on operations where large numbers of cattle are being handled to relieve the manual labor associated with hand operated levers.
specialist c's
other special chutes are available including those which include tilt tables, hoof repair platforms, and mobile chutes.
squeeze chute
one in which the sides of the chute can be moved inwards by a lever to squeeze and restrain the animal from moving. Common chutes used for beef cattle.
References in classic literature ?
You shoot not so straight as I, for all your bravado.
Now, in fact, a man must shoot very well indeed to shoot so badly as that.
133-139) So said Phoebus, the long-haired god who shoots afar and began to walk upon the wide-pathed earth; and all goddesses were amazed at him.
The naughty boy, to shoot the old poet in that way; he who had taken him into his warm room, who had treated him so kindly, and who had given him warm wine and the very best apples!
The snipe flying high above instantly folded its wings and fell into a thicket, bending down the delicate shoots.
Under favour, sir,'' replied the yeoman, ``I have another reason for refraining to shoot, besides the fearing discomfiture and disgrace.
And it seems that you asked him not to shoot the hare.
The time has been when I have shot thirteen deer without counting the fa’ns standing in the door of my own hut; and for bear’s meat, if one wanted a ham or so, he had only to watch a-nights, and he could shoot one by moonlight, through the cracks of the logs, no fear of his oversleeping himself neither, for the howling of the wolves was sartin to keep his eyes open.
The third brother met a huntsman, who took him with him, and taught him so well all that belonged to hunting, that he became very clever in the craft of the woods; and when he left his master he gave him a bow, and said, 'Whatever you shoot at with this bow you will be sure to hit.
Up jumped Good, burning for slaughter, and thinking, perhaps, that it was as easy to kill elephant as he had found it to shoot giraffe, but I caught him by the arm and pulled him down.
When Robin was a youth of eighteen, stout of sinew and bold of heart, the Sheriff of Nottingham proclaimed a shooting match and offered a prize of a butt of ale to whosoever should shoot the best shaft in Nottinghamshire.
They understood that the saddles and Junot's spoon might be of some use, but that cold and hungry soldiers should have to stand and guard equally cold and hungry Russians who froze and lagged behind on the road (in which case the order was to shoot them) was not merely incomprehensible but revolting.