shoon


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shoon

(sho͞on)
n. Archaic
A plural of shoe.
References in classic literature ?
They were all at the Opera that night, but looked round in vain for the fierce conspirators whom they were instructed to suppress.
The only means used to convince them of error and reclaim them from dissent was force, and force served but to confirm the opposition it was meant to suppress.
Basilio opened his eyes and gazing fixedly at her, said, "O Quiteria, why hast thou turned compassionate at a moment when thy compassion will serve as a dagger to rob me of life, for I have not now the strength left either to bear the happiness thou givest me in accepting me as thine, or to suppress the pain that is rapidly drawing the dread shadow of death over my eyes?
The army under such circumstances may usefully aid the magistrate to suppress a small faction, or an occasional mob, or insurrection; but it will be unable to enforce encroachments against the united efforts of the great body of the people.
John gave the name of the driver, which, as I have not been able to command the vehicle, I here suppress.
The poor fellow was quite broken down, now and again he gave a low groan which he could not suppress.
And, burying his face quickly in his hands, he tried in vain to suppress a sob.
The anger which fired the eyes of the Musketeer, in spite of his efforts to suppress it, terrified his sensitive inamorata.
Elizabeth's impatience to acquaint Jane with what had happened could no longer be overcome; and at length, resolving to suppress every particular in which her sister was concerned, and preparing her to be surprised, she related to her the next morning the chief of the scene between Mr.
On seeing him D'Artagnan could hardly suppress an exclamation of surprise.
The encouragers of the first mob never intended matters should go this length, and the people in general expressed the utter detestation of this unparalleled outrage, and I wish they could be convinced what infinite hazard there is of the most terrible consequences from such demons, when they are let loose in a government where there is not constant authority at hand sufficient to suppress them.
It is too difficult, because to meet such requirements the artist would have to do violence to his temperament, would have to write not for the artistic joy of writing, but for the amusement of half-educated people, and so would have to suppress his individualism, forget his culture, annihilate his style, and surrender everything that is valuable in him.