shivering


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shivering

 [shiv´er-ing]
involuntary shaking of the body, as with cold. It is caused by contraction or twitching of the muscles, and is a physiologic method of heat production in humans and other mammals. As a form of aerobic skeletal muscle activity, vigorous shivering uses about as much energy as riding a bicycle or shoveling snow. Weak or debilitated patients tolerate this activity poorly. Patients commonly feel helpless when experiencing contractions of muscles normally under voluntary control. Increased metabolic rate and oxygen demand caused by shivering are particularly stressful for patients with heart or lung disease. Cold-induced shivering is stimulated when body temperatures drop below the thermostatic range or “set point” governed by the hypothalamus. Shivering in fever occurs not because body temperatures fall but because the set point range is driven by the pyrogen. The more vigorous the shivering, the higher the fever is driven up. Heat loss from skin is a dominant stimulus.

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing),
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

The involuntary contraction of skeletal muscle due to exposure to cold or fright, or which is temporally related to the onset of fever

shiv·er·ing

(shiv'ĕr-ing)
Trembling resulting from cold or fear. Dogs may also shiver with anticipation, in a state of excitement.

shivering

A rapid succession of contractions and relaxations of muscles and an important means of heat production in the body. The temperature rise in high fever is caused mainly by shivering.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sample size was estimated by difference in mean time required for cessation of shivering after giving the drugs in both groups.
Pharmacological methods used during shivering management require adequate attention to the degrees of sedation, hemodynamic effects, and NMB.
The activity generated the same amount of irisin from muscles as shivering for 10 to 15 minutes.
No shivering was observed from October--January and in March.
Shivering was assessed using a modified scale from Tsai and Chu (0 = no shivering, 1=mild fasciculations on face and neck, 2=visible tremor involving more than one muscle group, 3=gross muscle activity involving the whole body) (10).
* Go indoors if you're shivering or if your nose, ears, fingers, or toes feel numb or tingle.
Parishioners are appealing to warm-hearted Coventry folk to help put an end to their shivering.
ATHE shivering was almost certainly due to what are called rigors.
He said: "It is terrible to think there could be people out there shivering when there is help at hand."
Shivering can increase your heat production by five to six times the normal amount.
The body's natural defences against the cold include restricting the flow of blood to the skin to prevent heat loss, shivering and releasing hormones to generate heat.