ship

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ship

(ship),
A structure resembling the hull of a ship.

SHIP

Abbreviation for:
Self-Help Intervention Project
Senior Health Insurance Program
sexual health in practice 
SH2-containing inositol phosphatase
Small Hospital Improvement Program
src homology 2-containing inositol phosphatase
STD/HIV Intervention Program
Supplemental Health Insurance Plan

ship

(ship)
A structure resembling the hull of a ship.
References in classic literature ?
So I hid in the baggage and was brought on to the ship with the hard-tack.
Stay here, my brave fellows,' said I, 'all the rest of you, while I go with my ship and exploit these people myself: I want to see if they are uncivilised savages, or a hospitable and humane race.
I told my men to draw the ship ashore, and stay where they were, all but the twelve best among them, who were to go along with myself.
With this he went about among the ships of the Achaeans.
Thus masterfully did he go about among the host, and the people hurried back to the council from their tents and ships with a sound as the thunder of surf when it comes crashing down upon the shore, and all the sea is in an uproar.
This was an account of the fight between a little ship called the Revenge and a Spanish fleet.
Jukes thought it very possible, and imagined the fires out, the ship helpless.
why, it was nothing at all; give us but a good ship and sea-room, and we think nothing of such a squall of wind as that; but you're but a fresh-water sailor, Bob.
He used some arguments with them, to show them the unreasonableness and injustice of the thing, but it was all in vain; they swore, and shook hands round before his face, that they would all go on shore unless he would engage to them not to suffer me to come any more on board the ship.
So the man was only too glad, and got in beside him; and the ship flew, and flew, and flew through the air, till again from his outlook the Simpleton saw a man on the road below, who was hopping on one leg, while his other leg was tied up behind his ear.
Nor did the clerks stand much higher in his good graces; indeed, he seems to have regarded all the landsmen on board his ship as a kind of Iive lumber, continually in the way.
He said that a ship needed, just like a man, the chance to show the best she could do, and that this ship had never had a chance since he had been on board of her.