shinrin-yoku

shinrin-yoku

(shĭn-rĭn-yō′koo) [Japanese, “forest-air-bathing”]
In traditional Chinese medicine, walking and bathing in the forest to promote good health and prevent the effects of aging. The air and aromas of the forest are also believed to be therapeutic.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shinrin-yoku - or forest bathing - was developed in Japan during the 1980s Guests take part in some shinrin-yoku - aka forest bathing, above, and below is the tea ceremony
Shinrin-yoku - or forest bathing - was developed in Japan during the 1980s Secluded cabins at Blackwood Forest in Hampshire
Williams introduces readers to the Japanese concept of shinrin-yoku, or 'forest bathing'; which is the idea of spending quality time in forests and natural areas to reap innumerable health benefits.
The Japanese have a concept called shinrin-yoku, which translates as forest bathing - this is the practice of taking a short, leisurely walk through a forest for health benefits.
Promotes effects of Shinrin-Yoku, the practice of bathing the senses in the atmosphere of the forest.
Forest bathing or Shinrin-yoku is the practice of taking a short, leisurely visit to a forest for health benefits.
Psychological effects of forest environments on healthy adults: Shinrin-yoku (forest-air bathing, walking) as possible method of stress reduction.
The idea of shinrin-yoku - "taking in the forest atmosphere" - took root in Japan back in the early 1980s and is now practised by a quarter of the population.
Shinrin-yoku, which translates as taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing, was developed by Japan's Forestry Agency in 1982 as a way to promote well-being in an overworked population that has one of the highest suicide rates in the world.
Forest bathing, the practice of Shinrin-yoku, is simply spending time in nature to reduce stress and promote well-being.
Physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the atmosphere of the forest) in an old-growth broadleaf forest in Yamagata prefecture, Japan.