shinrin-yoku

shinrin-yoku

(shĭn-rĭn-yō′koo) [Japanese, “forest-air-bathing”]
In traditional Chinese medicine, walking and bathing in the forest to promote good health and prevent the effects of aging. The air and aromas of the forest are also believed to be therapeutic.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Forests 70 years old or more have a greater effect," Felicia says, citing a study done on the Japanese phenomenon shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing.
The Japanese practice of 'shinrin-yoku', which literally translates as forest bathing, actually involves walking slowly and thoughtfully in woodland and 'bathing' in its peace and beauty to recharge your batteries.
The Duchess of Cambridge is a fan and shinrin-yoku was the inspiration behind her garden at this year's Chelsea Flower Show.
2 FOREST BATHING IS THE NEW SPA DAY "THE Japanese trend of 'shinrin-yoku', or 'forest bathing' as it's known, was first initiated as a government scheme in Japan to improve public wellbeing.
Forest bathing is a Japanese practice called shinrin-yoku (shinrin means 'forest,' and yoku, 'bath') where one bathes in the forest atmosphere.
Forest Bathing is the new spa day - "The Japanese trend of 'shinrin-yoku', or 'forest bathing' as it's known, was first initiated as a government scheme in Japan to improve public wellbeing.
Across the Golden Gate Bridge from San Francisco, towering old-growth coast redwoods provide the ultimate backdrop to practice the Japanese art of shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing.
The Japanese recommended shinrin-yoku, or forest bathing, to ease one's body, mind, and soul.
The physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the forest atmosphere or forest bathing): evidence from field experiments in 24 forests across Japan.
Forest bathing or shinrin-yoku is a Japanese practice of going to the forest to reconnect with nature and improve one's health, well-being and happiness.
"Shinrin-Yoku"--Forest Bathing: studies have involved over 1000 subjects, and two dozen different forest settings: Spending time in forest (vs.
Physiological effects of Shinrin-yoku (taking in the atmosphere of the forest): using salivary cortisol and cerebral activity as indicates.