Shigella

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Shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
a genus of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria containing four species that are differentiated by biochemical reactions: S. dysente´riae (subgroup A), S. flex´�neri (subgroup B), S. boy´dii (subgroup C), and S. son´nei (subgroup D). Their normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and higher monkeys; all species cause dysentery.

shigella

 [shĭ-gel´ah]
any individual organism of the genus Shigella.

Shigella

(shē-gel'lă),
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing gram-negative nonencapsulated rods. These organisms cannot use citrate as a sole source of carbon; their growth is inhibited by potassium cyanide and their metabolism is fermentative; they ferment glucose and other carbohydrates with the production of acid but not gas; lactose is ordinarily not fermented, although it is sometimes slowly attacked; the normal habitat is the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all of the species produce dysentery. The type species is Shigella dysenteriae.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]

shigella

(shĭ-gĕl′ə)
n. pl. shi·gellae (-gĕl′ē) also shi·gellas
Any of various nonmotile, rod-shaped bacteria of the genus Shigella, which includes some species that cause dysentery.

Shigella

Microbiology A genus of gram-negative bacilli of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and major cause of bacterial dysentery

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
A genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria containing gram-negative, non-spore-forming rods. A major cause of dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]

Shiga,

Kiyoshi, Japanese bacteriologist, 1870-1957.
Shigella boydii - a species found in feces of symptomatic individuals.
Shigella dysenteriae - a species causing dysentery in humans and in monkeys. Synonym(s): Shiga bacillus; Shiga-Kruse bacillus
Shigella flexneri - a species found in the feces of symptomatic individuals and of convalescents or carriers; the most common cause of dysentery epidemics and sometimes of infantile gastroenteritis. Synonym(s): Flexner bacillus; paradysentery bacillus
Shigella sonnei - a species causing mild dysentery and also summer diarrhea in children. Synonym(s): Sonne bacillus
Shigella - a genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae), all of whose species produce dysentery.
Shiga bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
Shiga-Kruse bacillus - Synonym(s): Shigella dysenteriae
shigellosis - bacillary dysentery caused by bacteria of the genus Shigella.

Shi·gel·la

(shē-gel'lă)
Genus of nonmotile, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria with habitat in the intestinal tract of humans and of higher apes; all species produce dysentery.
[Kiyoshi Shiga]
References in periodicals archive ?
Although our results suggest that shigellae with resistance to ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone, or azithromycin circulate predominantly among MSM in the United States, these strains are likely to emerge among other populations.
Furthermore, many public health jurisdictions do not routinely perform PFGE on shigellae, making it difficult to detect clusters and, when a cluster is detected, to locate all cases associated with the cluster.
Alternative treatment options are limited for persons infected with ciprofloxacin-, ceftriaxone-, or azithromycin-resistant shigellae, making shigellosis prevention critical.
Changing epidemiology of shigellosis and emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant Shigellae in India.
coli because shigellae are non- or late-lactose fermenters.
1.5 (0.9-2.2) 2.1 (1.0-3.9) 1.5 (1.0-2.2) Escherichia 1.5 (0.9-2.2) 13.8 (3.3-69.3) 1.6 (1.1-2.4) colil shigellae [RR.sub.MH-Pooled] Wald test for Co-infection (95% CI) heterogeneity p value Any pathogen 2.7 (1.9-3.6) 32.1 <0.001 Rotavirus 1.9 (1.2-2.9) 61.8 <0.001 Giardia sp.
Illness was expressed as episodes of diarrhea per person-year from which shigellae were recovered.
Multidrug resistance of shigellae is not new (1); many countries have reported resistance to amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, and chloramphenicol.
Of all serotypes of shigellae, Shigella dysenteriae type I attracts special attention for its epidemic-causing potential and its association with most serious dysentery cases, with a high attack rate, high case-fatality rate, and various complications (1).
Changes in the worldwide epidemiology of shigellae species have been documented in the last two decades.
soldiers and Vietnamese residents with diarrhea; levels of resistance to tetracycline, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, and novobiocem were high, particularly among shigellae. Other than these two studies, no data have been published in English on resistance patterns in enteric diarrheal pathogens in Vietnam, and no campylobacter resistance data from this country have ever been published.
No shigellae were resistant to ciprofloxacin in either country (Table 1).