shift

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Related to shiftlessness: intimidation

shift

 [shift]
a change or deviation.
antigenic shift a sudden, major change in the antigenicity of a virus, seen especially in influenza viruses, resulting from the recombination of the genomes of two different strains; it is associated with pandemics because hosts do not have immunity to the new strain. See also antigenic drift.
chloride shift the exchange of chloride and carbonate between the plasma and the erythrocytes that takes place when the blood gives up oxygen and receives carbon dioxide. It serves to maintain ionic equilibrium between the cell and surrounding fluid.
mediastinal shift a shifting to one side of the tissues and organs of the mediastinum; see also mediastinal shift.
shift to the left
1. a change in the blood picture, with a preponderance of young neutrophils.
2. an increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
shift to the right
1. a preponderance of older neutrophils in the blood picture.
2. a decreased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
weight shift
1. the frequent movement of a paralyzed or partially paralyzed patient to redistribute the patient's weight and prevent impairment of circulation, which leads to pressure sores. One variation is the wheelchair pressure release.
2. relocation of a patient's center of mass in order to allow movement; see also gait.

change

(chānj),
An alteration; in pathology, structural alteration of which the cause and significance is uncertain.
Synonym(s): shift

shift

(shift) a change or deviation.
chloride shift  the exchange of chloride (Cl−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) between plasma and the erythrocytes occurring whenever HCO3− is generated or decomposed within the erythrocytes.
Doppler shift  the magnitude of frequency change due to the Doppler effect.
shift to the left  an increase in the percentage of neutrophils having only one or a few lobes.
shift to the right  an increase in the percentage of multilobed neutrophils.

shift

Etymology: AS, sciftan, to divide
1 (in nursing) the particular hours of the day during which a nurse is scheduled to work. The day shift is usually 7:00 am to 3:00 pm or 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. The evening shift is usually 3:00 pm to 11:00 pm or 4:00 pm to 12:00 midnight, and the night shift the remaining hours. The evening shift is also called "relief," presumably because nurses originally worked 12-hour shifts and the evening and night shift was thought to be relief for the day nurse. Many innovations in staffing practice currently allow variations on the traditional 5-day, 40-hour week, such as nurses electing to work a shorter week, preferring longer hours for fewer days.
2 an abrupt change in an analytic system that continues at the new level.

shift

Vox populi
The change in a thing.

shift

(shift)
1. Synonym(s): change.
2. A period of 8-12 hours during which an employee is assigned to work on a given day. Division of each 24 hours into day, evening, and night shifts is intended to maximize efficiency.
See also: deviation

shift

a change or deviation.

antigenic shift
see antigenic shift.
chloride shift
see chloride shift.
shift to the left
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increase in the numbers of immature neutrophils, primarily band forms but metamyelocytes or more immature cells may also be present; usually in response to an infection.
Enlarge picture
Canine blood smear showing a shift to the left with a segmented neutrophil (left) with toxic vacuolation and a metamyelocyte (right) with two Döhle bodies. By permission from Willard MD, Tvedten H, Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods, Saunders, 2003
shift red cell
shift to the right
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increased number of mature neutrophils but no immature cells are present.

Patient discussion about shift

Q. I started a new job a month ago – it’s night shifts as a security guard in a large office building I don’t know why, but I started feeling very down in the last week. Can it be that the change in waking hours is effecting me?

A. there are dozens of studies about night shift workers that try to connect them to all sort of things. and there is a good reason- our hormonal balance is maintained by our Hypothalamus (an area in the brain). being awake on night time changes it's function, it changes our hormonal system balance and other things around our brain. this can easily cause things like depression amongst some people.

More discussions about shift
References in periodicals archive ?
While we have nothing but words of praise for the many excellent men and women who do so much to relieve distress, we have no toleration for that good natured, shiftlessness which prompts soft-hearted and soft-headed people to add to the demoralization of those who are already paupers in spirit.
The crop-lien system which is depopulating the fields of the South is not simply the result of shiftlessness on the part of Negroes, but is also the result of cunningly devised laws.
329) Although certain physical defects were considered "genetic," there was a significant emphasis on eliminating the "genetic defects" of promiscuity, shiftlessness, pauperism, and other traits without a genetic basis.
Sherwood Anderson saw the effect his father's shiftlessness and adultery had on his mother, and, as he explained in his semi-fictional autobiography Tar: A Midwest Childhood, he internalized the pain and guilt himself: "It was as though she had been struck a blow and when you looked at her you felt at once that your hand had delivered the blow.
charity the moment the factories diminish the hours of work and the numbers they employ The heedlessness and shiftlessness of .
According to the current welfare-reform rhetoric, staying home with your baby is a sign of laziness and shiftlessness.
21) While hinting at the systematic roots of this instability (what Jack Temple Kirby called "the southern pathology of permanent dependency" [3]), Light in August ultimately attributes Joe's and Lucas's transience to their individual characters, thereby repeating the dominant view that transformed forced migration into shiftlessness.
Ordinary poverty" is not caused by shiftlessness and the search for a handout.
Morrison uses a description of this decor to signify their disenfranchisement and the histories of their furnishings to tell of their systemic oppression, not individual shiftlessness.
We hear a great deal about the indolence and shiftlessness of the negro," he says to Ida, "but I have never met a people more pathetically eager to earn a living than these same negroes" (p.
Accounts of inherited shiftlessness, violence, hysterical fits, deformities, and feeble-mindedness recur throughout this narrative, which Kostir chalks up to "brains incapable of growing up like those of ordinary people.