shift

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shift

 [shift]
a change or deviation.
antigenic shift a sudden, major change in the antigenicity of a virus, seen especially in influenza viruses, resulting from the recombination of the genomes of two different strains; it is associated with pandemics because hosts do not have immunity to the new strain. See also antigenic drift.
chloride shift the exchange of chloride and carbonate between the plasma and the erythrocytes that takes place when the blood gives up oxygen and receives carbon dioxide. It serves to maintain ionic equilibrium between the cell and surrounding fluid.
mediastinal shift a shifting to one side of the tissues and organs of the mediastinum; see also mediastinal shift.
shift to the left
1. a change in the blood picture, with a preponderance of young neutrophils.
2. an increased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
shift to the right
1. a preponderance of older neutrophils in the blood picture.
2. a decreased oxygen affinity of hemoglobin.
weight shift
1. the frequent movement of a paralyzed or partially paralyzed patient to redistribute the patient's weight and prevent impairment of circulation, which leads to pressure sores. One variation is the wheelchair pressure release.
2. relocation of a patient's center of mass in order to allow movement; see also gait.

change

(chānj),
An alteration; in pathology, structural alteration of which the cause and significance is uncertain.
Synonym(s): shift

shift

(shift) a change or deviation.
chloride shift  the exchange of chloride (Cl−) and bicarbonate (HCO3−) between plasma and the erythrocytes occurring whenever HCO3− is generated or decomposed within the erythrocytes.
Doppler shift  the magnitude of frequency change due to the Doppler effect.
shift to the left  an increase in the percentage of neutrophils having only one or a few lobes.
shift to the right  an increase in the percentage of multilobed neutrophils.

shift

Etymology: AS, sciftan, to divide
1 (in nursing) the particular hours of the day during which a nurse is scheduled to work. The day shift is usually 7:00 am to 3:00 pm or 8:00 am to 4:00 pm. The evening shift is usually 3:00 pm to 11:00 pm or 4:00 pm to 12:00 midnight, and the night shift the remaining hours. The evening shift is also called "relief," presumably because nurses originally worked 12-hour shifts and the evening and night shift was thought to be relief for the day nurse. Many innovations in staffing practice currently allow variations on the traditional 5-day, 40-hour week, such as nurses electing to work a shorter week, preferring longer hours for fewer days.
2 an abrupt change in an analytic system that continues at the new level.

shift

Vox populi
The change in a thing.

shift

(shift)
1. Synonym(s): change.
2. A period of 8-12 hours during which an employee is assigned to work on a given day. Division of each 24 hours into day, evening, and night shifts is intended to maximize efficiency.
See also: deviation

shift

a change or deviation.

antigenic shift
see antigenic shift.
chloride shift
see chloride shift.
shift to the left
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increase in the numbers of immature neutrophils, primarily band forms but metamyelocytes or more immature cells may also be present; usually in response to an infection.
Enlarge picture
Canine blood smear showing a shift to the left with a segmented neutrophil (left) with toxic vacuolation and a metamyelocyte (right) with two Döhle bodies. By permission from Willard MD, Tvedten H, Small Animal Clinical Diagnosis by Laboratory Methods, Saunders, 2003
shift red cell
shift to the right
an alteration in the distribution of leukocytes in the peripheral blood in which there is an increased number of mature neutrophils but no immature cells are present.

Patient discussion about shift

Q. I started a new job a month ago – it’s night shifts as a security guard in a large office building I don’t know why, but I started feeling very down in the last week. Can it be that the change in waking hours is effecting me?

A. there are dozens of studies about night shift workers that try to connect them to all sort of things. and there is a good reason- our hormonal balance is maintained by our Hypothalamus (an area in the brain). being awake on night time changes it's function, it changes our hormonal system balance and other things around our brain. this can easily cause things like depression amongst some people.

More discussions about shift
References in classic literature ?
I don't believe a bit of it," said Sancho; "still, I'll do as your worship bids me; though I don't know what need there is for trying these experiments, for I can see with my own eyes that we have not moved five yards away from the bank, or shifted two yards from where the animals stand, for there are Rocinante and Dapple in the very same place where we left them; and watching a point, as I do now, I swear by all that's good, we are not stirring or moving at the pace of an ant.
It is shifted from one to another with so much dexterity, and under such plausible appearances, that the public opinion is left in suspense about the real author.
The wind suddenly shifted to the northeast, and the remnant of the sea fog melted in the blast.
The big building I had left was situated on the slope of a broad river valley, but the Thames had shifted perhaps a mile from its present position.
Then I shifted my position to a little knoll that gave me the advantage of a yard or more of eleva- tion and when I looked for him presently he was walking towards Woking.
Her dress, which was that of the women of Epirus, consisted of a pair of white satin trousers, embroidered with pink roses, displaying feet so exquisitely formed and so delicately fair, that they might well have been taken for Parian marble, had not the eye been undeceived by their movements as they constantly shifted in and out of a pair of little slippers with upturned toes, beautifully ornamented with gold and pearls.
In the third watch of the night when the stars had shifted their places, Jove raised a great gale of wind that flew a hurricane so that land and sea were covered with thick clouds, and night sprang forth out of the heavens.
Rose had formerly belonged to one of the gangs of pirates who infested the islands of the Mississippi, plundering boats as they went up and down the river, and who sometimes shifted the scene of their robberies to the shore, waylaying travellers as they returned by land from New Orleans with the proceeds of their downward voyage, plundering them of their money and effects, and often perpetrating the most atrocious murders.