shelf

(redirected from shelve)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

shelf

(shelf),
In anatomy, a structure resembling a shelf.

shelf

Etymology: AS, scylf
a flat, hard anatomical structure that resembles a ridge or platform.

shelf

(shelf)
anatomy A structure resembling a shelf.
References in classic literature ?
The counter, shelves, and floor had all been scoured, and the latter was overstrewn with fresh blue sand.
Nervously--in a sort of frenzy, we might almost say--she began to busy herself in arranging some children's playthings, and other little wares, on the shelves and at the shop-window.
And then came the city of Oakland, and on the shelves of that free library I discovered all the great world beyond the skyline.
The untidy top shelves looked suggestive of some lucky accident which might unexpectedly lead the way to success.
As the muffins disappear, little by little, the black shelves and nooks and corners begin to appear, and Mr Wegg gradually acquires an imperfect notion that over against him on the chimney-piece is a Hindoo baby in a bottle, curved up with his big head tucked under him, as he would instantly throw a summersault if the bottle were large enough.
I was assisted to this conclusion by seeing some of them gathered round the master of the boat, at one of the tables, drawing lots with all the anxieties and passions of gamesters depicted in their countenances; while others, with small pieces of cardboard in their hands, were groping among the shelves in search of numbers corresponding with those they had drawn.
And so he wandered on, alternating between depression and elation as he stared at the shelves packed with wisdom.
A search of the shelves of almost any public library will bring to light a book entitled, "A Naturalist Among the Head Hunters.
High oaken sideboards, inlaid with ebony, stood at the two extremities of the room, and upon their shelves glittered china, porcelain, and glass of inestimable value.
The upper slide, on being pulled down (leaving the lower a double mystery), revealed deep shelves of pickle-jars, jam- pots, tin canisters, spice-boxes, and agreeably outlandish vessels of blue and white, the luscious lodgings of preserved tamarinds and ginger.
She turned away to range some boxes on the shelves behind the counter.
Thud, thud, we could hear the impact of their great heads, and their bellowing shook the pans on the kitchen shelves.