electrode

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electrode

 [e-lek´trōd]
either of two terminals of an electrically conducting system or cell; specifically, the uninsulated portion of a lead that is in direct contact with the body.
active electrode therapeutic electrode.
calomel electrode one capable of both collecting and giving up chloride ions in neutral or acidic aqueous media, consisting of mercury in contact with mercurous chloride; used as a reference electrode in pH measurements.
depolarizing electrode an electrode that has a resistance greater than that of the portion of the body enclosed in the circuit.
hydrogen electrode an electrode made by depositing platinum black on platinum and then allowing it to absorb hydrogen gas to saturation; used in determination of hydrogen ion concentration.
indifferent electrode one larger than a therapeutic electrode, dispersing electrical stimulation over a larger area.
point electrode an electrode having on one end a metallic point; used in applying current.
therapeutic electrode one smaller than an indifferent electrode, producing electrical stimulation in a concentrated area; called also active electrode.

e·lec·trode

(ē-lek'trōd),
1. Device to record one of the two extremities of an electric circuit; one of the two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
2. An electrical terminal specialized for a particular electrochemical reaction.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]

electrode

Cardiac pacing A part of an electric conductor through which a current enters or leaves; uninsulated conductive part of a pacing lead or a unipolar implantable pulse generator's casing which makes electrical contact with tissue; electrodes are used to record the electric activity of contracting muscles; electromyographic data is collected by surface electrodes, fine wire and needle electrodes. See Ring electrode, SilverBullet electrode, Tip electrode.

e·lec·trode

(ĕ-lek'trōd)
1. Device to record one of the two extremities of an electric circuit; one of the two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
2. An electrical terminal specialized for a particular electrochemical reaction.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]

Electrode

Medium for conducting an electrical current-in this case, platinum wires.

e·lec·trode

(ĕ-lek'trōd)
Device to record one of two extremities of an electric circuit; one of two poles of an electric battery or of the end of the conductors connected thereto.
[electro- + G. hodos, way]
References in classic literature ?
'Many a time I've said it in my young days,' she says slowly.
When they got back to London Mildred began looking for the work she had asserted was so easy to find; she wanted now to be independent of Philip; and she thought of the satisfaction with which she would announce to him that she was going into rooms and would take the child with her.
'Shake me, shake me, I pray,' cried the tree; 'my apples, one and all, are ripe.' So she shook the tree, and the apples came falling down upon her like rain; but she continued shaking until there was not a single apple left upon it.
Annushka went out, but Anna did not begin dressing, and sat in the same position, her head and hands hanging listlessly, and every now and then she shivered all over, seemed as though she would make some gesture, utter some word, and sank back into lifelessness again.
She sat herself upon a revolving stool before a counter that was comparatively deserted, trying to gather strength and courage to charge through an eager multitude that was besieging breastworks of shirting and figured lawn.
They were certainly not intended for mourning, but she had no others, and with stockingless feet she followed the poor straw coffin in them.
"Why can't they leave me alone?" she thought bitterly, connecting Katharine and Ralph in a conspiracy to take from her even this hour of solitary study, even this poor little defence against the world.
The small dairies to the west, beyond Port-Bredy, in which she had served as supernumerary milkmaid during the spring and summer required no further aid.
At last a king's daughter came into the wood; she had lost her way, and could not find her father's kingdom again.
He's a hunchback, and he's horrid." "I don't believe you," said Mary; and she turned her back and stuck her fingers in her ears, because she would not listen any more.
She must want to see her father--there would be a great deal to tell him, and (she looked sympathetically at Terence) he would be so happy, she felt sure.
More nebulous were the memories of those early mornings when she had paused in the midst of getting breakfast to sniff in the clover-laden air and think how wonderful it would be if only she needn't stay in the hot, stuffy kitchen but could be free to call Bill and go picnicking or loaf deliciously under one of the big elms.