shame

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shame

(shām)
n.
a. A painful emotion caused by the awareness of having done something wrong or foolish: felt shame for cheating on the exam.
b. Respect for propriety or morality: Have you no shame?
c. Psychiatry A pervasive, negative emotional state, usually originating in childhood, marked by chronic self-reproach and a sense of personal failure.

shame

A distressing emotion involving a strong sense of having transgressed against a social or moral code. Shame is always relative to current mores or to the upbringing of the person concerned.
References in periodicals archive ?
Body shaming is not helpful to anyone -- that is why it's called 'shaming'.
There was an unbearable eruptive shaming quality to these periods, leading me to the formulation of a shame-space that dominated our conversation once the split between narcissistic and socialistic tendencies could no longer be maintained.
The leading focus of the shaming was their feeding choice (breastfeeding, bottle, solids) followed by parenting style.
Shaming, blaming, and maiming: Functional links among the moral emotions, externalization of blame, and aggression.
The naming and shaming scheme was revised in October 2013 to make it simpler to name and shame employers that do not comply with minimum wage rules.
They have shown themselves energetically immune to any of the shaming mechanisms that might be thrown in their paths.
Austen's narrator begins this defense with a seemingly firm disavowal of shame, refusing to participate in injurious shaming practices directed at novel writers and readers: "I will not adopt that ungenerous and impolitic custom so common with novel writers, of degrading by their contemptuous censure the very performances, to the number of which they are themselves adding" (22).
The results from this study suggest that parents who have higher expectations for their children in sport and a higher dysfunctional fan nature would be more likely to direct anger inwardly in response to a shaming experience (i.
s (2007) work on differentiation of the self, it is possible that if one is focused outside of the self, including on a higher power, the tendency for shaming thoughts and feelings is ameliorated and feelings of connectedness with the divine are enhanced.
One is that nudging by shaming can be either paternalistic or non-paternalistic and that, like any intervention, it is easier to justify when it is nonpaternalistic.
SHAMING fat people into shed ding the pounds can actually lead to them putting on more weight, a study has found.