shame

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shame

(shām)
n.
a. A painful emotion caused by the awareness of having done something wrong or foolish: felt shame for cheating on the exam.
b. Respect for propriety or morality: Have you no shame?
c. Psychiatry A pervasive, negative emotional state, usually originating in childhood, marked by chronic self-reproach and a sense of personal failure.

shame

A distressing emotion involving a strong sense of having transgressed against a social or moral code. Shame is always relative to current mores or to the upbringing of the person concerned.
References in periodicals archive ?
In terms of how the women felt when they were shamed, 57% said they became annoyed, followed by angry at 25%.
As the seeming scenario of a definitive humiliation takes shape, the degree of Catherine's shame wavers along with the swells and ebbs of her idiolect to create a spectacle of a shamed interiority that is vividly but incompletely exposed and defined, enticing readers to look closely and think critically as they negotiate ambiguous attributions of shame that might reverberate onto their own interpretive practices.
Some sorts of shame have little to offer the shamed individual but a paralyzing trauma (Woodward 2000: 213, 228, 229, 233).
001 Table 8 Independent Samples Student T Tests for differences between high and low internally shamed individuals in depression, anxiety and stress (N = 35) High ISS_S Low ISS_S t (383) M SD M SD Depression 9.
3 : to force by causing to feel shame <They were shamed into confessing.
It is they who should be named and shamed for not knowing what their kids are up to when they leave the house.
For our purposes, introducing shame for Homo moralis crimes could potentially "morally educate" the specific offenders without threatening the social norms underlying the proscribed conduct, but only under two conditions: (1) The underlying social norm must be close enough to the state-prescribed requirement to fall within the government's legitimate moral subsidy; and (2) the penalty must be focused enough to highlight the individual failings of the people who are shamed.
It does not matter whether the humiliated one has been shamed by derisive laughter or whether he mocks himself.
Would-be offenders will be deterred by the threat of being shamed for their offenses, and the retributive goals of the criminal law are satisfied by the reputational penalties suffered by actual offenders as a result of their shaming.
People who expressed anything but approval of sexual adventurism would be stigmatized: shamed for engaging in the oppressive act of shaming.
It was this differential, openly apparent to the eyes of all, that shamed the city.
criminal shamed in one community could easily pick up and move to