shame

(redirected from shamed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

shame

(shām)
n.
a. A painful emotion caused by the awareness of having done something wrong or foolish: felt shame for cheating on the exam.
b. Respect for propriety or morality: Have you no shame?
c. Psychiatry A pervasive, negative emotional state, usually originating in childhood, marked by chronic self-reproach and a sense of personal failure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

shame

A distressing emotion involving a strong sense of having transgressed against a social or moral code. Shame is always relative to current mores or to the upbringing of the person concerned.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
unlikely the possibility of a shamed person ever erasing their moral
They know they will be shamed but they don't seem to feel the
In fact, less than one percent of respondents said they changed their parenting beliefs as result of being shamed.
Austen conveys this form of shame through Elizabeth's pairing of a present-tense "I," emerging from a dawning sense of shame, with a "myself" of the past that is now revealed to have been devoid of shame until this enlightening "moment." The passage's culminating assertion of an "I" with newfound knowledge of "myself," to which that past self was "never" privy, marks the final incarnation of this formal strategy of placing the present "I" next to--neither fully identical with nor alienated from--the temporally and affectively receding version of "myself." Through the interplay of these selves, Austen creates a formal space of self-examination where the shamed and shameless versions of the self coexist, so that neither is ever fully fixed as absolutely shameful.
Chilton (2012) identifies a universal set of visible physical reactions to being shamed: "blushing, lowering of the eyes, hiding the face and stooping shoulders" (Chilton 2012: 5).
It is they who should be named and shamed for not knowing what their kids are up to when they leave the house.
On the other hand, the data the commission used for its `named and shamed' list was two to three years old, and some of the cities on the list have since come up to standard or have major works in progress."
Forced to wear the scarlet "A," Hester Prynne embroiders it lavishly, as if to embrace her very ignominy.(19) She and her daughter, Pearl, establish their own, defiant minicommunity on the margins of the town that had shamed them.(20) The same problem arises in our own era when inner-city youths who are convicted of crimes treat their criminal record as a badge of honor and seek the approval of gangs rather than return to law-abiding society.(21)
People who expressed anything but approval of sexual adventurism would be stigmatized: shamed for engaging in the oppressive act of shaming.
It was this differential, openly apparent to the eyes of all, that shamed the city.
Offenders who bring shame to their city by committing crimes are to be "named and shamed" by a council which plans to display their names and addresses in a "rogues' gallery", it was announced yesterday.
criminal shamed in one community could easily pick up and move to