shame


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shame

(shām)
n.
a. A painful emotion caused by the awareness of having done something wrong or foolish: felt shame for cheating on the exam.
b. Respect for propriety or morality: Have you no shame?
c. Psychiatry A pervasive, negative emotional state, usually originating in childhood, marked by chronic self-reproach and a sense of personal failure.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

shame

A distressing emotion involving a strong sense of having transgressed against a social or moral code. Shame is always relative to current mores or to the upbringing of the person concerned.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no shame in afterlife, only the lingering curiosity of those who still seek answers from the dead.
Learning to recognise your shame and healthy ways of managing it is vitally important for maintaining your self-esteem and positive relationships.
First of all, it's important to figure out what your own shame triggers are.
For example, a parent who fails to empathise with their child's feelings can trigger this type of shame.
DISAPPOINTED EXPECTATION: THIS type of shame stems from failing to achieve what you set out to do.
shame the transgressor, regardless of any active shaming performed by
shaming is dependent on inner feelings of shame, rather than on the acts
President Lahore Bar said the slogans of shame, share are for police.
When shame persists, there is a strong correlation with increased generalized and social anxiety symptoms.
Accordingly, understanding shame and guilt may represent a critical step in the rehabilitation process.
intuit--that shame is often at the heart of our spiritual, sexual, and
Despite not explicitly discussing shame affects, some of Bion's formulations appear to suggest the presence of shame.