shamanism


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shamanism

Ethnomedicine/Paranormal
An ancient spiritual and medical tradition still practised in many tribal cultures, which is based on the belief that healing has a spiritual (i.e., “other world”) dimension. To effect healing, shamans enter altered states of consciousness in order to communicate with other planes of existence, taking a journey to help the patient rediscover his or her connection to nature and the other plane. Shamanism is steeped in ritual (such as divination, dream interpretation and prophecy) and tribal psychology (through drumming, story-telling and chanting).
References in periodicals archive ?
Not only is he driven by the shamanism tied to Latino culture, but he also finds inspiration through the rich philosophical history of the Greeks.
Of course, the 'violent' kinds of shamanism and sorcery, whose implications for the social order in this Siberian territory we shall examine, substantially differ from the empirically demonstrable tools and techniques involved in homicide and violent crimes.
Spirit Possession in Korean Media: Christianity and Korean Shamanism
While skeptics may rail over shamanism's seemingly malleable approach to reality, the practices have proven the test of time.
He sets out a genealogy of thinking about shamanism in the West that includes both scholars and practitioners.
Its daunting length and awkward prose notwithstanding, Inuit Shamanism and Christianity makes a notable contribution to indigenous studies.
Winkelman, author of Supernatural as Natural: A Biocultural Approach to Religion and Pilgrimages and Healing, presents this in-depth look at shamanism, its original manifestations, and its biopsychosocial evolution.
In various discussions of Odin as a shaman-god, Glosecki observes his many shamanic traits: his association with the mead of poetry; his hanging on the world-tree Yggdrasil as a shamanic initiation rite; his sacrificing an eye for the gift of prophecy; his identification as shape-shifter; his eight-legged steed Sleipnir, which becomes his vehicle of ecstatic travel; his leading of the wild host of the dead (the Totenheer, the wild hunt); and the etymology of his name (OE wod "possessed, frantic" related to the Latin vates "seer, poet") (Shamanism passim).
Anne Lasimbang begins with post-Vatican II magisterial statements concerning shamanism: John Paul II's 1986 statement to aboriginal people in Australia where he insisted that they cherish and preserve their traditional culture and practices; the 1991 joint pontifical statement Dialogue and Proclamation (1991) that recognizes dialogue as a key aspect of the mission of the church; and Pope Benedict XVI's 2007 comment, "I repeat with insistence [that] interreligious and intercultural dialogue is not an option but a vital necessity of our time" (Zenit News Service, Feb.
Illustrated with full-color photography, particularly of Inuit carvings and sculptures of Sedna, The Sea Woman: Sedna in Inuit Shamanism and Art in the Eastern Arctic is an in-depth artistic and cultural study of the mythical Inuit figure of Sedna, the sea woman, believed to be the caretaker of animals' souls and avengers of transgressions against them (such as wanton or wasteful killing, as opposed to respectful killing and thorough use of their bodies).
Shamans and Shamanism is the fifth bibliography the Press has published.
I am a student and practitioner of the new shamanism in the U.S.