shamanism


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shamanism

/sha·man·ism/ (shah´-) (sha´mah-nizm″) a traditional system, occurring in tribal societies, in which certain individuals (shamans) are believed to be gifted with access to an invisible spiritual world and are able to mediate between it and the physical world to heal, divine, and affect events in the latter.

shamanism

a form of healing that incorporates personal healing, transformation, and regeneration through access to a "higher power." Sickness, disease, and illness are indicators that the individual is out of balance and in disharmony within the essential nature. Success can be achieved if people are, first, willing to take responsibility for the creation of the disease and, second, open to nonphysical realities of life and willing to engage with their inner spirit and their higher selves. This type of healing has been effective for sexual dysfunction, chronic fatigue syndrome, mental health concerns, and obesity and other eating disorders.

shamanism

Ethnomedicine/Paranormal
An ancient spiritual and medical tradition still practised in many tribal cultures, which is based on the belief that healing has a spiritual (i.e., “other world”) dimension. To effect healing, shamans enter altered states of consciousness in order to communicate with other planes of existence, taking a journey to help the patient rediscover his or her connection to nature and the other plane. Shamanism is steeped in ritual (such as divination, dream interpretation and prophecy) and tribal psychology (through drumming, story-telling and chanting).

shamanism (shôˑ·mn·izm),

n a diverse set of ritual healing practices that use trance and spiritual practices for therapy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also essential to Glosecki's concept of shamanism are ecstasy, a trancelike state in which the shaman enters another reality and time (Eliade's illo tempore) (8) and engages in a metempsychotic journey; therapy, where the shaman can engage in both healing or the inflicting of disease; and assistance, the presence of animal guardians (Shamanism 7-8).
Daniel Noel, a scholar of myth and religion, in his book The Soul of Shamanism: Western Fantasies, Imaginal Realities, voices the opinion that the work of Carlos Castaneda and many of today's popular teachers of shamanism are suspect on the grounds of the ignorance and sense of entitlement of whites to the artifacts of Native cultures: "This work of imaginative construction - never admitted as such - has promoted unconscious Western fantasies of immediate access to indigenous healing wisdom.
There is a plethora of anecdotal literature describing journeys but an absence of experimental studies specific to the effects of shamanism (Harner, 1995).
Connecting the shaman's trance with hallucinogen-derived ASC, Pearson credits Lewis-Williams and company with the first broad and flexible application of this idea to Paleolithic art, while allowing that Mircea Eliade and others were first to interpret Upper Paleolithic art as the result of shamanism.
In her informative introduction Turchi acknowledges that the word "shaman" has never been used in regard to customs on the island of Sardinia, but she maintains that shamanistic practices have survived from the pre-nuragic neolithic period when shamanism was imported with the wave of Asian migration.
Here, shamanism is not so much defined as a geographically and historically particular cultural expression, as a widespread cultural genre concerning religious leaders, teachers and healers that mediate with the 'supernatural' under altered states of consciousness, often drug-induced.
A synthesis of interdisciplinary evidence illustrates that shamanism is part of an evolved psychology that still forms part of human nature.
Keeney has been involved in shamanism for over 30 years, and has cultivated an intimate relationship with fellow practitioners of traditional healing.
Pereira is certainly accurate in his recognition of the characters' quest for self-affirmation, as well as the importance of reconnecting with their non-Western cultural heritage, but he does not acknowledge the centrality of shamanism to the structure of the drama.
As a university student in the early 1970s, little did Katsuyoshi Sanematsu know that picking up a Carlos Castaneda book would propel him on a nearly three-decade odyssey culminating in the publication this month of the first exhaustive account of Mayan shamanism by a Japanese scholar.
In South Korea there is no modernization without Christianity and no Christianity without shamanism.
Among the New Age mumbo jumbo and talk of angels, meditation and shamanism, Harris gives some practical advice about how to spot someone who will drain the life out of you rather than participate in a healthy give-and-take relationship.