shaman

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shaman

(shä′mən, shā′-)
n. pl. shamans
A member of certain traditional societies, especially of northern Asia and of North and South America, who acts as a medium between the visible world and an invisible spirit world and who practices magic or sorcery for purposes of healing, divination, and control over natural events.

sha·man′ic (shə-măn′ĭk) adj.

shaman

A “medicine man” or witch doctor from an aboriginal society, whose healing ability are attributed to trance-like or “supernatural” states.

sha·man

(shah'măn)
The name given among indigenous people (Native Americans, Innu, First Nations) to a healer, whose therapies range from chant and ritual to use of herbs.

shaman

(sha'mun) (sho'-) [Russ., ascetic]
A healer (usually from a tribal or preindustrial culture) who uses non-Western practices and techniques, including faith healing, spirituality, psychological manipulation, chanting, rituals, magic, and culturally meaningful symbolism to restore health or well-being to the sick.
Synonym: medicine man See: shamanism
References in periodicals archive ?
In Tyva the people who solicit shamanic intervention in interpersonal conflicts are--like the clients discussed by Gananath Obeyesekere in a well-known essay on practices of retaliatory sorcery in Sri Lanka (1975)--aware of the differences between supernatural weapons and material ones.
Even after more than twenty-five years of studying shamanic healing practices with Amazon and Inka shamans, and working with hundreds of clients, he writes, "My Western mind may not be fully confident that what I'm doing is 'real,' but I try not to allow my own doubt to get in the way of being of service.
Each week host Christina Pratt and guests explore the practical application of shamanic skills in our contemporary lives to create robust well-being, strong and clear community connections, and life enriching spiritual maturity.
Chapter eight is a discussion of Odysseus's journey as a descent into Hades with numerous comparative references to events and authors, including Eliade, who is well known for emphasizing the shamanic initiation in relation to flight.
Illness, accidents, and repeated misfortunes frequently stem from soul loss, Mokelke says, and it's the job of a shamanic practitioner, working with "highly evolved, compassionate spirits," to retrieve and restore the missing soul parts.
Historically, however, shamanic practitioners have used various technologies (e.
The shamanic journey is well documented but not in the research literature.
They also support Van Deusen's presentation of shamanic practice as a vital process, contexted in a long history.
These shamanic healers danced their way to healing guidance for their patients.
Tedlock has not just read a lot; she had read a lot for years, traveling the world participating in shamanic rituals and initiating the international scholarly discussion of shamanism.