shaman


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shaman

(shä′mən, shā′-)
n. pl. shamans
A member of certain traditional societies, especially of northern Asia and of North and South America, who acts as a medium between the visible world and an invisible spirit world and who practices magic or sorcery for purposes of healing, divination, and control over natural events.

sha·man′ic (shə-măn′ĭk) adj.

shaman

A “medicine man” or witch doctor from an aboriginal society, whose healing ability are attributed to trance-like or “supernatural” states.

sha·man

(shah'măn)
The name given among indigenous people (Native Americans, Innu, First Nations) to a healer, whose therapies range from chant and ritual to use of herbs.

shaman

(sha'mun) (sho'-) [Russ., ascetic]
A healer (usually from a tribal or preindustrial culture) who uses non-Western practices and techniques, including faith healing, spirituality, psychological manipulation, chanting, rituals, magic, and culturally meaningful symbolism to restore health or well-being to the sick.
Synonym: medicine man See: shamanism
References in periodicals archive ?
Shamans and fortune-tellers are not considered religious practitioners, but are categorized as service practitioners.
While he is not a shaman, it is a chance to learn more about ceremonial practice among the Achuar, an indigenous group with an approximately 2-million acre territory stretching from Ecuador to Peru.
The characterization of the Korean shaman as a skilled improviser would seem to contradict Hultkrantz's (1997, 2) much cited notion of the shaman as a "conservative factor in culture" and the shaman's ritual enactments as a stabilizing source of tradition.
When he arrived in France, after a while he felt the urge (provoked by his neeb spirits) to resume shamanizing and asked a White Hmong shaman, the only one shaman in the vicinity, to call back his spirit helpers.
Shamans of the Foye Tree stresses the importance of gendered power relations, which is a neglected topic in Mapuche ethnographies and in shaman studies in general.
Roughly put, the thinking was that if there were grave goods that could be attributed to a shaman, then the skeleton was male.
Address for correspondence: Jeffrey Shaman, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences.
There are those who believe that shamans have spiritual insights of great validity.
By Mike Derderian, Star Staff Writer In ancient times a Shaman was looked upon as a conduit between the visible and the invisible spirit world ; in Jordan, Shaman means the place where a person is offered three choices for a night out in Amman.
Kim's findings rest largely on observations of fifteen kut (shamanistic rites) and intensive personal contact with several shaman and those who sought them out.
In traditional Inuit society, the shaman was seen as a doctor-advisor-healer.