sham therapy

sham therapy

Treatment that has no known therapeutic effect. Such treatment may be employed by clinical researchers who are trying to determine whether another intervention will be more effective than doing nothing. Sham therapies are also sometimes used by people engaging in health care fraud.
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In a news release, the FDA said it examined the results of two studies of patients with diabetes who received usual DFU care along with either the shock wave therapy or a sham therapy.
Researchers randomized the group to receive either conventional care (CC; antibiotic treatment only), OMT and antibiotic therapy, or light-touch sham therapy with antibiotics.
Results of the double-blind, placebo-controlled study comparing eTNS to sham therapy for 43 adult patients with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder were reported by Dr.
physical therapy incorporating manual therapy, exercise, patient education, and in some cases use of an assistive device for walking, failed to lessen pain or improve function in hip osteoarthritis beyond what was achieved with a sham therapy, according to a report.
The 77 women randomized to endometrial scratching reported significantly higher pain scores during the procedure than did the 79 women given the sham therapy.
There were 10 studies that compared acupuncture to comparison groups receiving sham therapy (nonintervention), usual care, or education.
The metabolic syndrome resolved in 11 of 86 patients after CPAP therapy, compared with 1 of the 86 after sham therapy.
7 percent of those who received sham therapy, the study found.
In 14 studies that compared real acupuncture to sham therapy (instead of medication), 53 percent of acupuncture patients responded favorably to treatment compared to 45 percent in the control group.
In order to support these therapies, doctors must first see results from a study of a large number of patients in which half get the treatment and half receive sham therapy (i.
Raising doubts about physicians and scientists may discourage consumers from consulting them for information that would uncover a sham therapy.