inversion

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inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

/in·ver·sion/ (in-ver´zhun)
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

inversion of uterus  a turning of the uterus whereby the fundus is forced through the cervix, protruding into or completely outside of the vagina.
visceral inversion  the more or less complete right and left transposition of the viscera.

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.

inversion

[invur′zhən]
Etymology: L, invertere, to turn over
1 an abnormal condition in which an organ is turned inside out, such as a uterine inversion.
2 a chromosomal defect in which a segment of a chromosome breaks off and then reattaches to the chromosome in the reverse orientation, causing the genes carried on that part of the chromosome to be in an abnormal position and sequence.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Figure 1: The sites of the main nerve centres and descending pathways in the brain and spinal cord that control voluntary movement, represented in diagrammatic sections.

inversion

with reference to the foot: tilting of the sole inwards. inversion injury a common injury to the ankle joint in sport. Inversion of the foot usually occurs as a result of 'going over' on the ankle when the foot strikes the ground, especially if uneven or if the person is off balance. Results in damage to the lateral ligament complex, with bleeding, swelling and pain. Importantly affects proprioception and thus balance, necessitating a formal treatment and rehabilitation programme. See also anterior talofibular ligament; Figure 1.

inversion

turning inward

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]

inversion,

n the state of being upside down.

inversion

1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.

paracentric inversion
the inverted segment does not include the chromosome's centromere; has exactly the same size and shape as a normal chromosome but will have different banding patterns.
pericentric inversion
an inversion in a chromosome in which the centromere is included in the inverted segment.
teat inversion
the tip is invaginated so that the orifice is closed by the act of sucking. Causes a problem to sucking pigs. Affected sows should be culled.
References in periodicals archive ?
Havelock Ellis, "Sexual Inversion in Women," in his Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2, Sexual Inversion, 3rd ed.
The story charts a trajectory from a nonnormative love that cannot readily be assimilated to either nascent ideas of sexual inversion or homosexuality, to the emergence of the homosexual, mapping this transition onto the troubled socialization of its young protagonist.
No historical evidence indicates that any type of men's swimwear carried the same symbolic significance as neckties, but Ellis did remark that the color red "`has become almost a synonym for sexual inversion, not only in the minds of inverts themselves, but in the popular mind'" (p.
Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, a German lawyer and writer, developed his own congenital theory of sexual inversion in the early 1860s.
Chauncey, "From Sexual Inversion to Homosexuality: Medicine and the Changing Conceptualization of Female Deviance," Salmagundi 58-59 (Fall 1982-Winter 1983): 135-36.
69) Wooley was more of a behaviorist than a Freudian, yet the concept that maternal overprotection could lead to sexual inversion was widespread.
In The Well of Loneliness, Stephen accepts theories of sexual inversion expounded by sexologists like Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis as explanations for women attracted to other women.
Ellis, in his treatise entitled Sexual Inversion, propounded the idea that homosexuals, both men and women, were souls confined to the bodies of the wrong gender, and that the "actively inverted woman" bore a "distinct trace of masculinity" that marked her infertility:(22)
In a summation of his views published about the time Hemingway was writing A Farewell to Arms, Ellis identified three kinds of inversion, each of which had multiple variations: (1) "true congenital sexual inversion," which could occur early in life or later; (2) "bisexual attraction in which the individual's sexual impulse goes out towards individuals of both sexes (most though not all of these cases being apparently inverts who have acquired normal habits)"; and (3) "the large and vague class of the pseudo-homosexuals, whose perversity is due either to temporary circumstances (as among sailors), to senile impotency, or to a deliberate search for abnormal sensations" (Psychology of Sex: A Manual for Students 237).
Sometimes, indeed, the tendency to sexual inversion in eccentric and neurotic families seems merely to be Nature's merciful method of winding up a concern which, from her point of view, has ceased to be profitable.
Both sides in the war accused the others of sexual inversion - court effeminacy vs.