inversion

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inversion

 [in-ver´zhun]
1. a turning inward, inside out, or other reversal of the normal relation of a part.
2. in psychiatry, a term used by Freud for homosexuality.
3. a chromosomal aberration due to the inverted reunion of the middle segment after breakage of a chromosome at two points, resulting in a change in sequence of genes or nucleotides.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·ver·sion

(in-ver'zhŭn),
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
5. Conversion of a chiral center into its mirror image.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

inversion

(ĭn-vûr′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act of inverting.
b. The state of being inverted.
2. Psychology In early psychology, behavior or attitudes in an individual considered typical of the opposite sex, including sexual attraction to members of one's own sex. No longer in technical use.
3. Chemistry Conversion of a substance in which the direction of optical rotation is reversed, from the dextrorotatory to the levorotatory or from the levorotatory to the dextrorotatory form.
4. Genetics A chromosomal rearrangement in which a segment of the chromosome breaks off and reattaches in the reverse direction.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

inversion

Orthopedics A frontal plane movement of the foot, where the plantar surface is tilted to face the midline of the body or the medial sagittal plane; the axis of motion lies on the sagittal and transverse planes; a fixed inverted position is referred to as a varus deformity
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; specifically, the hydrolysis of sucrose to d-glucose and d-fructose; so called because of the change in optic rotation.
3. Alteration of a DNA molecule made by removing a fragment, reversing its orientation, and putting it back into place.
4. Heat-induced transition of silica, in which the quartz tridymite or cristobalite changes its physical properties as to thermal expansion.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

inversion

a CHROMOSOMAL MUTATION in which a segment becomes reversed and, although there is no loss or gain of genetic material, there may be a positive or negative POSITION EFFECT on the phenotype.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

in·ver·sion

(in-vĕr'zhŭn)
A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one.
[L. inverto, pp. -versus, to turn upside down, to turn about]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Noting an aversion within this discourse to discussing deviant sexual practices, Paul Peppis explains that Havelock Ellis' book Sexual Inversion, for example, "attempts to challenge popular prejudices against homosexuals...
(1.) Havelock Ellis, "Sexual Inversion in Women," in his Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 2, Sexual Inversion, 3rd ed.
Further, Edith Ellis combined her ideas on sexual inversion and the apparently irreconcilable demands of eugenics to argue that the sexual invert had a valuable role to play in creating a superior society.
The story charts a trajectory from a nonnormative love that cannot readily be assimilated to either nascent ideas of sexual inversion or homosexuality, to the emergence of the homosexual, mapping this transition onto the troubled socialization of its young protagonist.
Females changed sex between 85.5 and 125.0 cm in length (the overlap zone between male and female sizes) and the median size of sexual inversion was 103.3 cm.
The time was simply not ripe for Symonds's erotic poetry, or his work on sexual inversion. Hence conformity, experimentalizing of a type, was still expedient, while the knowing worked quietly for change.
(5) Havelock Ellis, Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume II: Sexual Inversion, 3rd ed.
First, since this paper represents a series of tentative questions about the relationship between reading and identity as well as a genealogy of reading practices vis-a-vis the portraits of female masculinity in two texts, The Well of Loneliness by Radclyffe Hall (1928) and Stone Butch Blues by Leslie Feinberg (1993), in the context of sexological discourse, including Havelock Ellis's "Sexual Inversion In Women," (5) it is necessary to locate that reading within a specific, albeit always already fictional, story about my own reading practices.
In the plays, particularly, Wilde repeatedly throws into question all assurance of a continuous "social identity." Images of split and half-hidden selves in The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest may be seen as metaphors for sexual inversion, as long as one bears in mind that no essential identity is being promoted as a last resort.
It is tempting to think that Hall got into trouble simply for raising the issue of lesbianism, since female "sexual inversion" (as it was then known) was not legally recognized in early twentieth-century Britain.
We want to know what is naturally lawful under the various sexual chances that may befall man, not as the born child of sin, but as a naturally social animal, what is a venial sin against nature, what a mortal sin against nature" (Sexual Inversion 91).
He called it the "Sotadic Zone," derived from the name of the Greek poet Sotades as a euphemism for "sexual inversion." According to Burton, climate was seen to facilitate pathological love, not race, as argued by most of his contemporaries.