sextan


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sextan

 [seks´tan]
recurring on the sixth day (i.e., five days after the previous episode).

sex·tan

(seks'tăn),
Denoting a malarial fever the paroxysms of which recur every sixth day, counting the day of the episode as the first; that is, with a 4-day asymptomatic interval.
[L. sextus, sixth]

sextan

Occurring every 6 days, especially of MALARIA.

sextan

recurring on the sixth day (every 5 days).
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References in periodicals archive ?
This also explains their position in the sky, because the fastest runaways are ejected along the orbit of the LMC towards the constellations of Leo and Sextans.
Scan the April chart on page 37 and you'll come across lesser-known constellations such as Hydra, the Water Snake; Crater, the Cup; and Sextans, the Sextant.
Alongside their more conventional fittings, Artemide have launched two flamboyant new designs: Pipe Sospensione, a flexible chord wall or ceiling fitting, left; and Sextans with its hot-formed acrylic body raised on slender chrome legs.
1) [Sextantarius = containing a sextans = a sixth part of a measure.
From Earth, this axis runs toward the constellation Sextans in one direction and the constellation Aquila in the other.
As observed from Earth, the discoverers said, the axis runs one way toward the constellation Sextans and the other toward the constellation Aquila.
On May 17, 2007, OSG took delivery of the Overseas Sextans, which began a three-year time charter.
To answer that question, astronomers surveyed 70,000 galaxies in the Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS), where some of the most powerful telescopes on Earth and space have imaged a 2-square-degree patch of sky in the constellation Sextans.
Jardel used telescope observations of several of the satellite galaxies orbiting the Milky Way, including the Carina, Draco, Fornax, Sculptor, and Sextans dwarf galaxies.
It moves into Sextans in late March and resumes direct motion in May, when UK observers will lose it.
Venus moves lower in the western sky this month, dropping toward Sextans, under Leo and Saturn.
Viewed with an ordinary telescope, a certain patch of sky in the direction of the constellation Sextans appears virtually empty -- certainly devoid of any bright objects.