severe sepsis

severe sepsis

A condition defined clinically as 'Sepsis associated with organ dysfunction, hypotension, or hypoperfusion abnormalities (which include) …lactic acidosis, oliguria, or an acute alteration in mental status; SS is part of a continuum of a biologic inflammatory response to infection that evolve toward septic shock. See Sepsis, Septic shock, SIRS.
References in periodicals archive ?
It can be of two types severe sepsis when there's organ failure and other is septic shock in which there are the symptoms of severe sepsis includes a low blood pressure.
Enlivex Therapeutics announced that the safety review committee of the Company's ongoing Phase Ib clinical trial in patients with severe sepsis reviewed the data for the first two study cohorts, which included six patients, and provided a positive recommendation to the regulatory authorities for continued enrollment of patients in the study.
The (https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/factsheet_sepsis.aspx) National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) estimates that more than one million people suffer from severe sepsis every year in the U.S.
The research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could help to predict which patients are at high risk for severe sepsis or who may need more aggressive treatment.
Surviving Sepsis Campaign: international guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock, 2012.
In total, 101 patients with severe sepsis were enrolled in the Emergency Department of Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital from January to December 2016.
Furthermore, it has been observed that community-acquired severe sepsis represents 25% of severe sepsis, indicating that its pre-hospital identification is crucial (14).
Recently, the terms sepsis and septic shock have been redefined and simplified, doing away with the older terms 'SIRS' (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) and 'severe sepsis'.
It is estimated that there are over 30,000 cases of severe sepsis in the UK every year.
Sepsis is an often-deadly condition that affects 26 million people worldwide every year1 and is increasing at a rate of 1.5% annually.2 Timely and accurate detection solutions in the acute-care setting are key components to stopping the progression of sepsis, as patients with less severe sepsis can progress to severe sepsis or septic shock within 72 hours.3 Up to half of patients with sepsis die.2,4 In addition to the human toll, this global crisis places a significant clinical and economic burden on the healthcare system.5 A clear link exists between the timeliness of treatment and the possibility of death.
Xuan Han, M.D., from the University of Chicago, and colleagues evaluated the implications of the Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Early Management Bundle (SEP-1) on patient care and outcomes among adults admitted to a single institution between November 2008 and January 2016.

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