seton

(redirected from setons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

se·ton

(sē'tŏn),
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]

seton

[sē′ton]
thread, gauze, or other material passed through subcutaneous tissue or a cyst to create a sinus or fistula.

se·ton

(sē'tŏn)
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]

seton

1. a thin woven fabric wick, 6 in × 0.25 in, used as a primitive vaccination technique by dipping the seton in a bowl of 'vaccine', e.g. pleural exudate from a case of contagious bovine pneumonia.
2. a thread of gauze or other suture material threaded through tissue and used to keep a wound open.
References in periodicals archive ?
017), and it was seen that anal fistula plug was more successful than cutting seton (table).
For high trans-sphincteric anal fistulas with abscess and local sepsis, a loose seton to act as drainage seton or a drainage tube seton should be placed aiming to eradicate sepsis12.
On the basis of the results obtained in the study, it can be concluded that the anal fistula plug is more successful when compared with cutting seton in terms of frequency of closure of fistula.
At the time, Seton, thirty-four, appeared to be a confirmed bachelor.
Ernest's numerous name changes show his determination to claim his blood ties with Seton ancestors whose high rank, he believed, was his lost birthright.
Grace Thompson Seton in the great parade of the National Suffrage Association that braved the wind and rain on the way to the Coliseum, where the cause of women's suffrage was presented to the resolutions committee of the Republican National convention" (Stanton et al.
Seton was ready to write another book of her own, so in 1921 she went abroad again--this time on an extensive tour of Italy, Egypt, and France.
Seton refused her husband's half-hearted invitations to live with him at Little Peequo (with Julia Buttree and her husband housed nearby), choosing instead a self-enforced homelessness, a pattern for her writing life that lasted from 1922 to 1926.
Despite the cool and distant relationships within the Seton family after her conversion, Elizabeth held onto the hope of improving life for her children.
This arrangement was more than challenging for the Seton boys, ages 9 and 7, who were often taunted by the boarders because of their Catholicism.
This structure remains as a historic building, The Mother Seton House, and is open to the public, located at 600 North Paca Street, Baltimore, Maryland (http://baltimoremuseums.
During its year of operation, there were only 10 pupils including the Seton girls.