seton

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se·ton

(sē'tŏn),
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

se·ton

(sē'tŏn)
A wisp of threads, a strip of gauze, a length of wire, or other foreign material passed through the subcutaneous tissues or a cyst to form a sinus or fistula.
[L. seta, bristle]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A novel material in seton treatment of fistula-in-ano.
Cutting seton versus two-stage seton fistu- lotomy in the surgical management of high anal fistula.
Elastic one-stage cutting seton for the treatment of high anal fistulas: preliminary results.
Group A comprised patients undergoing treatment with anal fistula plug while group B included patients undergoing treatment with cutting seton. All the patients received rectal enema on the night before surgery and morning of surgery.
Silk 1 seton was passed from external to internal opening and tied tightly, in patients randomized to seton group (group B).
Patients in group A were followed up at two weeks, four weeks and eight weeks and at twelve weeks while those in group B underwent tightening of the seton under local anesthesia every week till the seton cut through.
Seton began her professional life as a designer, not of gowns, however, but of covers and borders for her books and her husband's.
While femininity and domesticity were poses, more than ideologies, for Grace Seton, they were well suited to her.
As the 1912 Good Housekeeping article notes, Seton courted danger as much as high fashion.
Elizabeth Seton and her Sisters of Charity began Saint Joseph's Academy and Free School at Emmitsburg, Maryland, in 1810.
At a meeting of the hierarchy of the United States in 1852, Robert Seton (1839-1927) recalled the reputation of his grandmother.
Despite the cool and distant relationships within the Seton family after her conversion, Elizabeth held onto the hope of improving life for her children.