set-aside

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set-aside

noun Money (a set-aside) taken out of the budget for a specific purpose (e.g., to fund a congressionally mandated program).
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to Congresswoman Nydia Velazquez, the 2015 National Defense Authorization Act includes a provision to assure women-owned set-aside contracts are not inappropriately diverted to non-women-owned firms
Homeland Security EAGLE II: Small, 8(a), HUBZone, SDV set-aside.
A contrary theory holds that old-fashioned prejudice, glass ceilings, and corporate inflexibility--the nexus of oppression--do more to stimulate minority and female entrepreneurship than all the set-asides combined.
Pena alone has succeeded at gradually dismantling federal set-asides.
Indeed, the very principle of set-asides is under attack in Turner v.
Ruling on a protest by Mission Critical Solutions of Tampa, FL, GAO told the Army it should have considered a HUBZone set-aside for a follow-on contract for IT support even though the work had previously been set aside for an 8(a) firm.
16 /PRNewswire/ -- Set-aside awards in Fiscal Year 2006 (FY06) are anticipated to total more than $20 billion in cumulative value, according to a report released today by INPUT, the authority on government business.
who led the fight to end the set-aside program, said it gives women and minorities a clear preference that violates the constitutional guarantee of equal protection of the law.
Pena decreed that states and localities must apply a standard of "strict scrutiny" to their racial set-aside programs.
It's unfortunate that people think the set-asides for minorities are the only ones," says Smith, whose company graduated from 8(a) nearly a decade ago.
In deciding a bid protest last fall, GAO said HUBZone firms are legally entitled to priority in set-asides over SDVs because of the wording of the laws establishing the two programs.
In jettisoning set-asides, the administration ends the type of affirmative action programs that officials say are most difficult to defend and most resemble quotas, which Clinton has said he opposes.