service user


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

service user

A generic term for a person who uses health and/or social care services from service providers.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) report said a panel concluded Breed told a service user to "pipe down" and said there was "drool all over" their T-shirt.
"You visited service user BB in your own personal time and when you had no remit to do so.
The group is made up of resident representatives, from all of Falcon Support Service's projects and forms a consultation board for the charity's future developments, manages their own budget creating positive activities for service users, and assists in the running of the buildings including health and safety checks.
The law also guarantees confidentiality of all information, communications, and records, in whatever medium regarding the service user. Such information will only be disclosed to third parties if a written consent from the service user, or their legal representative, is provided.
The PRIME research has increasingly pointed to the need for mental health service user involvement in all aspects of health system strengthening (Abayneh et al., 2017; Gurung et al., 2017).
The hearing was also told "evidence that service users suffered emotional harm" as a result of her behaviour.
Overall, the ceremony proved to be a productive evening with a lot of interaction between the service user, their parents, instructors, and other external guests.
Misconceptions of service provider qualifications may have a great impact on service user's willingness to seek help from primary care providers.
The "service user" is central to recent health visiting policy; the Health Visiting Service Specification (NHS England, 2014) incorporates the new vision for nursing and the 6C's (Department of Health, (DH), 2012) with the aim that health visitors will:
These standards provide a useful basis to guide services, not only in Australia but also the UK, where the patient in this context is termed a 'service user'.
We can provide a befriending service too to support a service user to participate in social activities.
Clearly no single skill, method, practice or service alone can automatically lead to success, and ultimately enacting and maintaining change is affected by the skills, efforts and commitment of the practitioner, while being wholly dependant on the choices, motivations and circumstances of the service user. Effective use of the supervisory relationship and setting to identify where particular behaviours, circumstances, relationships or support networks may be problematic, can be just as important as identifying where new opportunities, support networks or solutions may be identified from, as well as focusing on pro-social goals and ambitions (McNeil, 2006; Locke and Latham, 2002).

Full browser ?