service dog


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service dog

n.
A dog that has been specially trained to assist a disabled person with certain daily tasks, such as picking up an object from the floor.
A dog trained to care for a person with disabilities, most commonly those with visual impairment, but also those with ambulatory disabilities in wheelchairs

service dog

A dog trained to care for a person with disabilities, most commonly those with visual impairment, but also those with ambulatory disabilities who are confined to wheelchairs. See Adaptive equipment, Americans with Disabilities Act, Physical barriers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jack will begin his journey by entering into our service dog raiser program for the next 9-18 months.
The second the driver saw me he told not to get on the bus, I showed him my certificate that proves Ruby is my service dog, but he kept insisting.
As part of the competition, dog handlers with their service dogs went through five difficult stages.
Imagine scraping, scrimping, and saving all your hard-earned dollars to realize a long-held dream--the purchase of a well-trained service dog for yourself, a family member, or a friend.
--Foundation training: This orients clients to their service dog and prepares them for life with their new partner.
The ADA does require service dogs to be harnessed, leashed or tethered unless those devices interfere with the service dog's work or the individual's disability prevents using those devices.
All monies raised will help to acquire and train a post-traumatic stress disorder service dog and bring a veteran to the This Able Veteran campus for the three-week Trauma Resiliency Program with their new canine partner, complete with housing, training equipment and most meals.
A valid question that gets raised from time to time is whether or not a service dog can be utilized by a hospital employee.
Such incidents infuriate responsible service dog owners such as the Harrisons, whose dog Wyn had to pass a 2V2-hour, 15-part test to receive its certification, including remaining stationary after a piece of steak was dropped near her feet.
study, a single-subject, alternating-treatment design (Barlow & Hayes, 1979; Deitz, 2006) was used to compare the effects of two conditions: non-intervention, no service dog present, and intervention, service dog present.
Over the course of its fundraising, the Dogtopia Foundation raised more than $140,000 to support the training of 12 service dogs.
Another recipient, Sergeant Trent Dirks, received his service dog Tracer after being diagnosed with PTSD.

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