serologist


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serologist

 [se-rol´ah-jist]
a specialist in serology.

serologist

[sirol′əjist]
Etymology: L, serum, + Gk, logos, science
a bacteriologist or medical technologist who prepares or supervises the preparation and testing of sera used to diagnose and treat diseases and to immunize people against infectious diseases. Also called an immunologist.

serologist

(sē-rŏl′ō-jĭst) [″ + Gr. logos, word, reason]
An individual trained in the science of serology.

serologist

a specialist in serology. An old term for immunologist.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the forensic serologist working for the state concocted four theories--none of them grounded in science--to explain away the mismatch and, therefore, save the confession.
The importance of written protocols and adherence to proper procedure would later be demonstrated by Fred Zain, the former head serologist of the West Virginia State Police crime laboratory.
Based on the results of its 2012 survey and review of the science of RHD genotyping, the CAP TMRC has recommended a multiorganizational collaboration among obstetricians, transfusion medicine specialists, serologists, and molecular scientists to update current practice guidelines and establish a nationwide, uniform practice.
The level-three forensic science students worked with pathologists and serologists at the National Institute of Legal Medicine, Bucharest.
But serologists of all ideological stripes encountered a fundamental problem: they simply could not establish connections between blood type and race in a scientifically meaningful way.
Ludwik Hirszfeld (1884-1954), one of the most prominent serologists of the twentieth century, discovered the inheritance and established the nomenclature of blood groups and opened the field of human population genetics.
Though he went on to caution that "[a]fter 25 years of progress, we serologists have mapped most of the known blood group genes for racial groups throughout the world, and while clear-cut gene markers are known in respect to some human races, it seems clearly evident that blood group genetical studies do not tell us the racial components of the Pacific peoples or their paths of migration" (1962:209).
I went to specialist after specialist --osteopaths, endocrinologists, serologists, neurologists (even to kinesiologists, acupuncturists, and people who claimed to be able to leach toxins from my body by immersing me in muddy baths)--but never received either relief or a credible diagnosis.
Serologists test for the 16 most common blood antigens and serum proteins.