sequoiosis


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pneumonitis

 [noo″mo-ni´tis]
inflammation of the lung; see also pneumonia.
hypersensitivity pneumonitis a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction to repeated inhalation of organic particles, usually in an occupational setting, with onset a few hours after exposure to the allergen. Many different substances are potential causes of the condition; see bagassosis, farmer's lung, and pigeon breeder's lung. Characteristics include fever, fatigue, chills, unproductive cough, tachycardia, and tachypnea; in the chronic form there is interstitial fibrosis with collagenous thickening of the alveolar septa. Called also extrinsic allergic alveolitis.
radiation pneumonitis lung inflammation resulting from radiation exposure, usually radiation therapy, with coughing, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltration of secretions, leading to mild to severe or even fatal fibrosis 6 to 9 months after the exposure.

se·quoi·o·sis

(sē'kwoy-ō'sis),
Extrinsic allergic alveolitis caused by inhalation of redwood sawdust containing spores of Graphium, Pullularia, Aureobasidium, and other fungi.
[Sequoia (genus name) for Sequoah (George Guess), Cherokee scholar, + G. -osis, condition]

sequoiosis

/se·quoi·o·sis/ (se″kwoi-o´sis) hypersensitivity pneumonitis due to inhalation of and tissue reaction to dust from moldy redwood bark.
A hypersensitivity pneumonitis of redwood loggers caused by exposure to spores of Pullularia pullulans, a yeast-like fungus

sequoiosis

Pulmonary medicine A hypersensitivity pneumonitis of redwood loggers caused by exposure to Pullularia pullulans spores. See Hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

se·quoi·o·sis

(sē'kwoy-ō'sis)
Extrinsic allergic alveolitis caused by inhalation of redwood sawdust containing spores of Graphium, Aureobasidium, and other fungi.
[Sequoia (genus name) for Sequoyah (George Guess), Cherokee scholar, + G. -osis, condition]

sequoiosis

a hypersensitivity pneumonitis of humans caused by inhalation of Corphium and Pullularia species in moldy redwood bark.