sequestrum


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Related to sequestrum: involucrum

sequestrum

 [se-kwes´trum] (L.)
1. a piece of dead bone that has become separated from sound bone during the process of necrosis.
2. any tissue that has become sequestered.

se·ques·trum

, pl.

se·ques·tra

(sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră),
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

(sĭ-kwĕs′trəm)
n. pl. seques·tra (-trə)
A fragment of dead bone separated from healthy bone as a result of injury or disease.

sequestrum

Orthopedics A plug of necrotic bone separated from viable bone. See Button sequestrum, Kissing sequestrum.

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
A piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]

sequestrum

A piece of dead, often detached, bone lying within a cavity or abscess. Sequestra usually form as a result of long-term OSTEOMYELITIS.

se·ques·trum

, pl. sequestra (sē-kwes'trŭm, -tră)
Piece of necrotic tissue, usually bone, which has become separated from the surrounding healthy tissue.
[Mod. L. use of Mediev. L. sequestrum, something laid aside, fr. L. sequestro, to lay aside, separate]
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation criteria for therapeutic effects: Infectious bone defect healing: disappearance of systemic and local symptoms and signs, sinus healing, no sequestrum on X-rays, bone healing in continuity.
The initial CT scan revealed only the indirect signs of the abscess--air bubbles in the prestyloid compartment and large bony sequestrum of the tympanic part of the temporal bone.
On the other hand, the histopathological findings of BRONJ are characterized by sequestrum, agglomeration of microorganisms, and necrotic tissue filled with neutrophils and other cells, with no specific histopathological findings.
Keywords: Conjunctival graft; corneal sequestrum; feline; keratectomy
Next, I was introduced to a cat from the Blue Cross, Jill, who had corneal sequestrum in one of her eyes.
[6] Our patient was immunocompetent but developed extensive osteomyelitis involving about two thirds of the humerus sparing proximal bone with separated sequestrum which was removed.
In one patient with a fibular autograft after P1 resection there was an osteomyelitis of the bone graft, and a sequestrum had to be removed.
Her wound was managed with secondary intention with local control of infection with antibiotics and resection of sequestrum. She is now ambulating with a heel minus foot and has a well-adapted gait.
Infrequently, a bony sequestrum may be present; however, this can also be seen in osteomyelitis, fibrosarcoma and primary lymphoma of bone.
Further analysis found that the antibody prevented formation of sequestrum, or a piece of dead bone, which is a hallmark of osteomyelitis.