sequestration

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sequestration

 [se″kwes-tra´shun]
1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathologic process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.
pulmonary sequestration loss of connection of lung tissue, and sometimes bronchi, with the bronchial tree and pulmonary veins, the tissue receiving its arterial supply from the systemic circulation. It may be completely separated anatomically and physiologically from normally connected lung (extralobar) or contiguous to and partly surrounded by normal lung (intralobar). Called also accessory lung.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn),
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sequestration

Medtalk
1. The development of a sequestrum. See Bronchopulmonary sequestration, Carbon sequestration, Pseudosequestration, Pulmonary sequestration.
2. The removal or isolation of a chemical, molecule, cell, or tissue from general access–eg, binding of certain proteins–eg, profilin, thymosin β4, Gc protein to G-actin to prevent polymerization. See Carbon sequestration.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sequestration

Separation and physiological isolation of a portion of dead tissue from surrounding healthy tissue. The commonest example of sequestration is the formation of a bony SEQUESTRUM as a complication of OSTEOMYELITIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

Sequestration

A process in which the spleen withdraws some normal blood cells from circulation and holds them in case the body needs extra blood in an emergency. In hypersplenism, the spleen sequesters too many blood cells.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into body spaces so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes extremely rare diseases can mimic common illnesses as in this case but a very high index of suspicion is required to diagnose such rare disorders like pulmonary sequestration.
Bronchopulmonary sequestration presenting as recurrent pneumonia.
When the Pentagon released a detailed breakdown of sequestration consequences relative to the five-year budget plan earlier this spring, it clearly showed that the higher Army force levels and the 11th carrier are not supported in the budget.
Since the Defense Department cannot clearly articulate what is in and what is out of its own budget request, it is clouding the picture of what continued sequestration would mean and what increased defense spending might afford the nation if reversed.
Intralobar pulmonary sequestration: an uncommon case with triple arterial supply and systemic venous drainage.
Once the bacteria have colonized the sequestration, infection can progress because of the lack of normal bronchial drainage.
(2) Cystic changes, as seen in patient 3, are usually multiple in nature and are usually surrounded by emphysematous changes, presumably due to air trapping from the sequestration itself (Figure 3).
Intralobar sequestration: radiologic-pathologic correlation.
Budget cuts before the sequestration began included thousands of military over the past 5 years through reductions in force and Selective Early Retirement Board actions, with many more cuts programmed over the next 5 years.
"It's unthinkable to Virginia, to our employment needs, but it's also unthinkable to the ability and the commitment of America to maintain our liberty, with liberty for all," Romney said during a September 8 appearance in Virginia Beach, citing a Bob Woodward book that suggests the White House came up with the sequestration deal.