sequestration


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sequestration

 [se″kwes-tra´shun]
1. abnormal separation of a part from a whole, as a portion of a bone by a pathologic process, or a portion of the circulating blood in a specific part occurring naturally or produced by application of a tourniquet.
2. isolation of a patient.
pulmonary sequestration loss of connection of lung tissue, and sometimes bronchi, with the bronchial tree and pulmonary veins, the tissue receiving its arterial supply from the systemic circulation. It may be completely separated anatomically and physiologically from normally connected lung (extralobar) or contiguous to and partly surrounded by normal lung (intralobar). Called also accessory lung.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn),
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

Medtalk
1. The development of a sequestrum. See Bronchopulmonary sequestration, Carbon sequestration, Pseudosequestration, Pulmonary sequestration.
2. The removal or isolation of a chemical, molecule, cell, or tissue from general access–eg, binding of certain proteins–eg, profilin, thymosin β4, Gc protein to G-actin to prevent polymerization. See Carbon sequestration.

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into spaces within the body so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to the heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]

sequestration

Separation and physiological isolation of a portion of dead tissue from surrounding healthy tissue. The commonest example of sequestration is the formation of a bony SEQUESTRUM as a complication of OSTEOMYELITIS.

Sequestration

A process in which the spleen withdraws some normal blood cells from circulation and holds them in case the body needs extra blood in an emergency. In hypersplenism, the spleen sequesters too many blood cells.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy

se·ques·tra·tion

(sē'kwes-trā'shŭn)
1. Formation of a sequestrum.
2. Loss of blood or of its fluid content into body spaces so that it is withdrawn from the circulating volume, resulting in hemodynamic impairment, hypovolemia, hypotension, and reduced venous return to heart.
[L. sequestratio, fr. sequestro, pp. -atus, to lay aside]
References in periodicals archive ?
It explained that its 2006 resolution as affirmed by the Supreme Court's 2012 decision nullified 'only the sequestration orders of the properties in the name of Araneta (italics in original)...
As early as 1966, appellate courts gave wide discretion to administrative agencies in evaluating whether to impose witness sequestration. Sauls v.
Pulmonary sequestration (PS) was first described by Rektorzik in 1861 and reported incidence is 0.15% - 6.4% of all congenital pulmonary malformations.4 Embryologically, different theories have been proposed regarding its development.
Conservation tillage plays an important role in the carbon sequestration by increasing carbon concentration in the topsoil.
The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium, led by the Illinois State Geological Survey, is evaluating CCS options for the 60,000-square-mile Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky.
There is no consistent approach for counting carbon sequestration benefits of forests and forest products in global, federal and state inventory systems.
There is enough unhappiness about sequestration on both sides of the aisle to motivate members to support some form of repeal, he said.
But while the specter of sequestration loomed and all parties fretted, there was a growing readiness crisis at the Department of Defense (DoD).
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Sequestration is a term only Washington could love.
On top of those spending caps, BCA mandated additional automatic spending cuts to both defense and NDD spending (known as "sequestration") in the event that Congress failed to agree to a more comprehensive deficit reduction plan.
Greenert: Sequestration threatens naval readiness Adm.