sequester


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sequester

 [se-kwes´ter]
1. to detach or separate abnormally a small portion from the whole.
2. to isolate a portion of a chemical system by chelation or other means; see also sequestrant.

sequester

/se·ques·ter/ (se-kwes´ter)
1. to detach or separate abnormally a small portion from the whole. See sequestration and sequestrum.
2. to isolate a constituent of a chemical system by chelation or other means.

sequester

[sikwes′tər]
Etymology: L, sequestare, to lay aside
to detach, separate, or isolate, such as patient sequestration to prevent the spread of an infection.

sequester,

v 1. to detach, separate, or isolate. A patient might be sequestered to prevent the spread of an infection.
2. the isolation of a jury during the conduct of a trial.

sequester

to detach or separate abnormally a small portion from the whole.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mac Thomberry, R-Texas, and others to steer the ship of state away from the sequester iceberg.
Roughly six in 10 do not have an opinion about how the sequester has affected their own lives, with more saying it has been bad rather than good.
Bob McDonnell, the governor, fears the sequester could pitch the state into recession.
Many Americans expect the budget cuts in the sequester to have a negative impact on the country overall.
His figures directly contradict assertions that we could sequester around one billion tons of carbon dioxide by adding 33,000 tons of iron to the Southern Ocean, the generally accepted figure.
The 10% sequester holdback will have impacts on communities across the nation, the American people and the environment.
In the United States alone, those formations have the potential to sequester as much as 3 trillion metric tons of carbon dioxide.
What [this experiment] means is that the Southern Ocean cannot sequester the amount of C[O.
Such practices could sequester between 50 million and 100 million tonnes of carbon a year in European soils.
Farmers and other landowners can benefit from this new economy by conducting land management practices that help sequester carbon dioxide, creating credits they can sell to industry to "offset" industrial emissions of greenhouse gases.
In contrast, he says, although the common garter snakes that he studies eat poisonous newts and the poison lingers in their bodies, they don't sequester it in special glands.