septicemic plague


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Related to septicemic plague: pneumonic plague, bubonic plague, septicemia, Yersinia pestis

sep·ti·ce·mic plague

a generally fatal form of plague in which there is an intense bacteremia with symptoms of profound toxemia.
Synonym(s): pestis siderans

septicemic plague

[sep′tisē′mik]
a rapidly fatal form of bubonic plague in which septicemia with meningitis occurs before buboes have had time to form. Compare bubonic plague, pneumonic plague. See also plague, Yersinia pestis.

septicemic plague

Severe bubonic plague; septicemia may precede the formation of buboes.
See also: plague

plague

an epidemic of disease attended by great mortality.

bubonic plague
an acute febrile, infectious, highly fatal disease caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis. It is primarily a disease of rats and other rodents, dogs and cats, and is usually spread to humans by fleas. The more common form of plague is the bubonic. There is also a pneumonic type in humans, which can be spread directly from person to person by droplet infection. The clinical signs in all species are fever, vomiting and enlargement of lymph nodes, the buboes that give the disease its name.
cattle plague
duck plague
an acute infectious disease of ducks caused by a herpesvirus and characterized by tissue hemorrhages and blood free in body cavities, eruptions on the mucosae of the digestive tract, degeneration of parenchymatous organs and lesions in lymph nodes. Called also duck virus enteritis.
equine plague
see african horse sickness.
fowl plague
see avian influenza.
pneumonic plague
see bubonic plague (above).
septicemic plague
hematogenous spread of infection to many organs may occur without the formation of buboes; occurs in the cat with pulmonary involvement, disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and death.
swine plague
see swine plague.
sylvatic plague
bubonic plague in wild animals in uninhabited areas. See also sylvatic plague.
References in periodicals archive ?
Septicemic plague constitutes a medical emergency, which, unless the clinician has good reason to suspect the specific etiology, usually has a working diagnosis that is nonspecific (e.