sepsis syndrome


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sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.

sepsis syndrome

clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sepsis syndrome

A constellation of signs, Sx, and systemic responses caused by a wide range of microorganisms that may eventuate into septic shock; SS is a systemic response to infection
Sepsis syndrome, defining parameters  
• Temperature Hypothermia < 35ºC–96ºF or hyperthermia > 39ºC–101ºF
• Tachycardia > 90 beats/minute
• Tachypnea > 20 breaths/minute
• Site of infection Clinically evident focus of infection or positive blood cultures
• Organ dysfunction 1+ end organs with either dysfunction or inadequate perfusion or cerebral dysfunction
• Metabolic derangement Hypoxia–PaO2 < 75 mm Hg, ↑ plasma lactate/unexplained metabolic acidosis
• Fluid imbalance Oliguria–< 30 mL/hr
• WBC counts < 2.0 x 109/L; > 12.0 x 109/L–US: < 2000/mm3; > 12 000/mm3
Note: The confusing semantics of the terms sepsis, sepsis/septic syndrome, and septic shock are unlikely to be resolved in the forseeable future; the terms sepsis and septic syndrome are essentially interchangeable and would in part overlap with septicemia–the early components of a pernicious infectious cascade that has spilled into the circulation; the term septic shock is used when the process becomes virtually irreversible.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function or perfusion manifested by at least one of the following: altered mental status, hypoxemia, acidosis, oliguria, or disseminated intravascular coagulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

sep·sis syn·drome

(sep'sis sin'drōm)
Clinical evidence of acute infection with hyperthermia or hypothermia, tachycardia, tachypnea, and evidence of inadequate organ function.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Evidence to support poor recognition of sepsis syndromes includes lack of adequate fluid boluses for patients who met the definition for hypotension at admission, indicating that clinicians did not recognise the importance of hypotension as a clinical indicator of organ dysfunction in sepsis.
Definition of the cases: patients 31 days to 14 years of age who died of sepsis syndrome, during a 5-year period 1999-2003 in HUV in Cali.
In addition, we demonstrate the efficacy of a novel therapeutic strategy for sepsis syndrome using a peptide derived from the receptor binding region of apoE.
These bacteria produce toxins that facilitate entry of bacteria into the circulation and contribute to a downward spiral of events, referred to as sepsis syndrome, as well as intra-abdominal abscess:
Sepsis syndrome and failure to institute treatment with antifungal drugs (the latter occurred mainly in preterminal hematology patients) were independent predictors of death.
Sepsis syndromes: understanding the role of innate and acquired immunity.
Among the CLAL studies, 10 were limited to patients meeting the criteria of sepsis syndrome (SS),[64] and this subgroup was compared with the other CLAL studies (non-SS studies).
In these people, the body's natural antibacterial response runs amok, leading to the dangerous symptoms of sepsis syndrome. This disorder, described centuries ago by Hippocrates, can culminate in fatal septic shock.
The patient was admitted to a telemetry bed and was started on aggressive IV hydration and IV ceftriaxone as a treatment for severe sepsis syndrome. The source of the sepsis was thought to be a urinary tract infection as the urine culture grew Kluyvera ascorbata and Streptococcus agalactiae (group B), and both organisms were sensitive to ceftriaxone.
Early-onset sepsis syndrome is also associated with acquisition of micro-organisms from the mother through blood-borne transplacental infection of the foetus, ascending infection and infection upon passage through an infected birth canal or exposure to infected blood at delivery.
Meta-analyses of trials of intravenous immunoglobulin for suspected or proven neonatal sepsis suggest a reduced rate of death from any cause, but the trials have been small and have varied in quality.14 A number of studies support the administration of IVIG along with supportive and antibiotic therapy in neonatal sepsis.14-16 According to the International Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock in 2008, there is a grade 2C recommendation for the use of polyclonal immunoglobulin in paediatric sepsis syndrome.17 Based on these guidelines, the administration of intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulin has been reported to reduce the mortality rate and is a promising adjuvant in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock in neonates.18
Xanthine oxidase activity and free radical generation in patients with sepsis syndrome. Crit Care Med.