sentinel lymph node biopsy


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sentinel lymph node biopsy

dissection of the first lymph node in the chain of lymph nodes to catch metastatic tumor cells from a primary breast tumor or melanoma.

sentinel lymph node biopsy

A procedure, performed most often for breast cancer and less commonly for melanomas, in which a dye (Patent Blue V) and/or radioactive substance (99mTc-labelled colloid) is injected near a tumour; it flows into the sentinel lymph node (the first lymph node that cancer spreads to from a primary cancer). In the breast, 90% of the sentinel nodes are in the axilla, 10% in the internal mammary chain. The sentinel lymph is identified by a dye or a handheld gamma probe, removed and sent to pathology. If the sentinel node is negative for cancer (about 5% of cases are false negative), then it is likely that the tumour has not spread to the nodes and the considerable morbidity associated with removing the lymph nodes (e.g., marked lymphoedema with compromised quality of life, restricted shoulder movement, sensory loss, seroma formation, longer hospital stay and future risk of angiosarcoma) can be avoided.

Sentinel positivity
Macrometastasis: 50% risk of non-sentinel lymph node involvement.
Micrometastasis: Breast, 20% risk of non-sentinel lymph node involvement.

Micrometastasis
Melanoma
Predictors of poor prognosis
• Presence of infiltration of the sentinel node capsule;
• Tumour penetrative depth of > 2 mm;
• Largest tumour deposit of 30 cells.
Metastasis detected by immunocytochemistry, 9% risk of non-sentinel lymph node involvement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Patterns of recurrence following a negative sentinel lymph node biopsy in 243 patients with stage I or II melanoma.
Our case highlights one of the confounding complications of sentinel lymph node biopsy with methylene blue dye.
Most (62%) had undergone a lumpectomy, and 73%, a sentinel lymph node biopsy.
Sentinel lymph node biopsy in early breast cancer surgery working with the risks of vital blue dye to reap the benefits.
Axillary lymph node echo-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology enables breast cancer patients to avoid a sentinel lymph node biopsy.
Current controversies in sentinel lymph node biopsy for breast cancer.
A procedure that is widely used is called sentinel lymph node biopsy.
In the 1960s sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) was described (1) as a technique for detecting spread from parotid cancer.
To better distinguish those patients who need an ALND from those who don't, patients now can undergo a less invasive technique called sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB).
A new trial has now shown side effects are greatly reduced using the second technique, known as Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy (SLNB).
Veronesi and coworkers found the false-negative rate for sentinel lymph node biopsy was 3.
An exciting development now being widely tested is the sentinel lymph node biopsy, where this single lymph node is removed instead of a more extensive underarm lymph node removal (axillary node dissection).