sentiment

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sen·ti·ment

(sen'ti-ment),
1. Feeling or emotion in relation to one idea.
2. A complex disposition or organization of a person with reference to a given object (a person, thing, or abstract idea) that makes the object what it is for him or her.
[L. sentio, to feel]

sentiment

(sĕn′tĭ-mĕnt) [L. sentio, to feel]
1. Feeling, sensibility; any emotional attitude toward objects or subjects.
2. Tenderness.
References in classic literature ?
They would take neither the glow of passion nor the tenderness of sentiment, but retained all the rigidity of dead corpses, and stared me in the face with a fixed and ghastly grin of contemptuous defiance.
With our modern and altogether rational ideas of the absurdity and impiety of warfare, we are not precisely in that frame of mind best adapted to sympathize with the sentiments, and thus to appreciate the real excellence of the poem.
If passions are born and nourished, as they say, under the influence of romantic causes, never did so many circumstances of that kind concur in uniting two young souls by one and the same sentiment.
Democracy is better for us, because the religious sentiment of the present time accords better with it.
This in itself constitutes an unimpeachable indictment of weakness, Then, influenced doubtless by an illogical feeling of sentiment, you permitted her to walk abroad in the fields to a place where she was able to make an almost successful attmept to escape.
I suppose," Wingrave continued, "that I was born with the usual moral sentiments, and the usual feelings of kinship towards my fellow creatures.
In the hero's erratic march from poverty in the first act, to wealth and triumph in the final one, in which he forgives all the enemies that he has left, he was assisted by the gallery, which applauded his generous and noble sentiments and confounded the speeches of his opponents by making irrelevant but very sharp remarks.
Their kind sentiments awaken spontaneously towards the interesting possessors of it.
To a man of my sentiments it is unspeakably gratifying to be able to say this.
He did not conceal either of these sentiments from his empanelled countrymen, and that sort of compunction appeared shockingly imperfect to the crammed court.
Why, sir,' returned Dick, 'between Miss Sophia Wackles and the humble individual who has now the honor to address you, warm and tender sentiments have been engendered, sentiments of the most honourable and inspiring kind.
But my father was not a man much troubled with spiritualism; religious sentiment he had none, beyond a veneration for God, as decidedly the head of the upper classes.