sentiment

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sen·ti·ment

(sen'ti-ment),
1. Feeling or emotion in relation to one idea.
2. A complex disposition or organization of a person with reference to a given object (a person, thing, or abstract idea) that makes the object what it is for him or her.
[L. sentio, to feel]

sentiment

(sĕn′tĭ-mĕnt) [L. sentio, to feel]
1. Feeling, sensibility; any emotional attitude toward objects or subjects.
2. Tenderness.
References in periodicals archive ?
sentimentality within it, it may be necessary to reconsider the project
Socialism and all liberalism are built on sentimentality and the exploitation of empathy and compassion.
Galicia, a Sentimental Nation is an important and eloquently expressed position regarding the cultural and sexual politics of Spain that will demand the attention of all scholars interested in revising contemporary portrayals of Galician history and its dependence on the debilitating idea of sentimentality.
Their sentimentality has tended to go unacknowledged ever since because it was what Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick calls an 'open secret' in Australian society (145).
This chapter, like the rest of the book, transforms the now rich body of work on sentimentality into a way to wrestle with what Barnes presents as a distinctively American paradox: Love's Whipping Boy illuminates the mechanisms by which sentimentality facilitates collaborations that work against one's own interest (such as willingly cooperating with enemies of one's country), but at the same time it facilitates the constitution of a sense of self founded upon the bonds of shared sympathy.
Pastoral settings have always been especially prone to sentimentality. Gerard Manley Hopkins's mythic representations of the pastoral male form in "Harry Ploughman," though linguistically hypnotizing, can be read with a critical skeptical eye: "In him, all quail to the wallowing o' the plough:'s cheek crimsons; curls / Wag or crossbridle, in a wind lifted, windlaced-- / See his wind-lilylocks-laced." Would it be possible to represent an urban body with such verve?
Sentimentality rating: 9 Longevity rating: 8 RADIOHEAD - SAIL TO THE MOON It was the birth of Thom Yorke's son Noah that inspired this track from Hail to the Thief, and Yorke has spoken of how fatherhood has affected his songwriting - encouraging him to voice his unease at social injustice and our responsibility to future generations.
Barrett Browning suffered from the nineteenth- and twentieth-century devaluation of sentimentality in a more complex and profound way than did any other writer of the era in Britain or the United States.
Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture (Duke 2008), brought the discussion full-circle by moving beyond the by now well-known complaints about sentimentality to understand more fully the kind of political and affective work it does and therefore account for its astounding durability.
But sentimentality also carries the connotation of falseness or phoniness.
For those of you made queasy by sentimentality, feel free to move on now--it's only going to get worse.
The chief reason Gates gives for his interest in the project is twofold: to reassess the novel proper and to contest James Baldwins 1949 critique of it as "a very bad novel" in its "self-righteous, virtuous sentimentality." The result of Gates's reassessment is a mixed bag.