sensual

(redirected from sensually)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl),
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sensual

[sen′sho̅o̅·əl]
Etymology: L, sensualis
pertaining to a great interest in sex, food, or other sense-satisfying topics.

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]

sen·su·al

(sen'shū-ăl)
1. Relating to the body and the senses, as distinguished from the intellect or spirit.
2. Denoting bodily or sensory pleasure, not necessarily sexual.
[L. sensualis, endowed with feeling]
References in periodicals archive ?
Riding on a wave of smoldering horns and soothing orchestration that recalls the heyday of Stax and Hi Records, Crow is intoxicating as a romantic daydreamer who sensually coos, "My baby I just want to be with you.
The Star Booth will offer hot and sensually saturated performances of such adult industry stars as Adriana Russo (Hungary),
In such a state of fascination, the object of your fixation can never be held fast, possessed, but only sensually perceived or experienced.
50, or Mark Hill Ceramic Styling booster brush, pounds 12, both from Boots, so it rests sensually along the top of the eye line.
She shows how the surrealists used eros as a political device, a means for making social commentary at once in their art, their writing, and their sensually lavish, provocatively interactive exhibition spaces.
Adapted from three short stories by Quebec-based Haitian writer Dany Laferriere by the brilliant French director Laurent Cantet (``Human Resources,'' ``Time Out''), the movie is both sensually languid and charged with an underlying unease.
Teacher Wendy Bryan said: "We felt it would help the children sensually and emotionally.
In the original version of "The Indian to His Love" (which appeared as "An Indian Song" in The Dublin University Review in December 1886), Yeats invokes in the second stanza Shakespeare's imagery of Time from the above lines to depict the sensually enjoyable and yet spiritually imperishable love of the Indian lovers:
Her sensually percolating "Chocolate" features violinist Regina Carter, and in the ebullient "Joy" she declares, "I'm grateful you give me joy.
Black pepper, violet, smoke and cherry notes start to emerge in a feminine and almost sensually provocative parade of delicate flavors of red fruits and earthy notes.
Close your eyes and you can picture yourself dancing sensually with your honey through the streets of Cuba.
The colorful designs throughout will give all readers a sensually pleasing experience and will inspire them to make projects to show off and share.